Paddy and Water Environment

, Volume 11, Issue 1–4, pp 207–216

Seasonal changes in properties of abandoned terraced paddy field soil incubated under different water content conditions

Article

Abstract

The chemical properties of soil samples collected in August and November from an abandoned terraced paddy field dominated by reeds were examined by in vitro incubation under normal moisture and flooded conditions. Soil pH extracted with water [pH(H2O)] was higher in soil samples collected from a depth of 0–10 cm in November than in samples collected in August; a high pH(H2O) was maintained even during nitrification under normal moisture conditions. When soil samples collected in August from a depth of 0–10 cm were incubated under flooded conditions, a significant decrease in reduction potentials (Eh) and an increase in total Fe2+ concentrations were observed. Reductive conditions during sampling were strong in soil samples collected in August from a depth of 40–50 cm. Moreover, under normal moisture conditions, soil samples collected in August showed significant decreases in pH(H2O) and significant production of water-soluble SO42− than those collected in November. Glucose addition to soil samples collected from a depth of 0–10 cm caused nitrogen immobilization under normal moisture conditions, increases in exchangeable Fe2+ and Mn2+, and decreases in exchangeable bases (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+) under flooded conditions. Seasonal changes in soil properties were probably due to microbial activity and vegetation phenology; thus, the timing of soil sampling influenced incubation experiment results. When abandoned terraced paddy fields are created as biotopes, seasonal changes in reductive soil conditions and slope position must be considered to prevent soil acidification and base cation elution.

Keywords

Abandoned terraced paddy fields Reed stand Seasonal change Soil characteristics Soil microbes Water content conditions 

References

  1. Anzai T, Matsumoto N (1988) Emergence of weeds and changes in soil properties in fallow paddy fields. Bull Chiba Agric Exp Stn 29:93–104 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  2. Arita Y, Kobayashi T (2000) The land-use changes of “yatsuda” and the peculiarity of the paddy field vegetation. J Jpn Inst Landsc Archit 63(5):485–490 (in Japanese with English summary)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Asami T (1970) A study on the dynamics of free irons in paddy soils (I) Reduction of free irons and organic matter in paddy soils. Jpn J Soil Sci Plant Nutr 41:1–6 (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  4. Bohlen PJ, Groffman PM, Driscoll CT, Fahey TJ, Siccama TG (2001) Plant–soil–microbial interactions in a northern hardwood forest. Ecology 82:965–978Google Scholar
  5. Chen RS, Yang KH (2011) Terraced paddy field rainfall-runoff mechanism and simulation using a revised tank model. Paddy Water Environ 9:237–247CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Chiba K, Koga K, Baba H (1997) Soil physical properties of uncultivated paddy fields located in semi-wet sloping land and the simulation of their response to heavy rain. Trans Jpn Soc Irrigat Drain Reclamat Eng 190:61–70 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  7. D’Angelo EM, Reddy KR (1999) Regulators of heterotrophic microbial potentials in wetland soils. Soil Biol Biochem 31:815–830CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. El-Haris MK, Cochran VL, Elliott LF, Bezdicek DF (1983) Effect of tillage, cropping, and fertilizer management on soil nitrogen mineralization potential. Soil Sci Soc Am J 47:1157–1161CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Hanya T, Ogura N (1995) Survey method of water quality (3rd ed). Maruzen, Tokyo (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  10. Ichinose T (2007) States and problems of biotope restoration and creation in Japan. Tsuchi to Kiso (present name: Geotechnical Engineering Magazine) 55(7):8–11 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  11. Kanda K, Miranda CHB, Macedo MCM (2002) Carbon and nitrogen mineralization in soils under agro-pastoral systems in subtropical central Brazil. Soil Sci Plant Nutr 48:179–184CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kimura M (1994) Characteristics of soils as a place of material circulation. In: Nioh I, Kimura M (eds) Soil biochemistry. Asakura, Tokyo, pp 1–20 (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  13. Koranda M, Schnecker J, Kaiser C, Fuchslueger L, Kitzler B, Stange CF, Sessitsch A, Boltenstern SZ, Richter A (2011) Microbial processes and community composition in the rhizosphere of European beech—the influence of plant C exudates. Soil Biol Biochem 43:551–558PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Kumada K, Asami T (1958) A new method for determining ferrous iron in paddy soils. Soil Plant Food 3:187–193CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kuramoto M, Kosuge N, Takahashi K (1970) Cation exchange capacity, total exchangeable bases, base saturation percentage. In: The committee on the methods of soil nutrient analysis (ed) Methods of soil nutrient analysis. Yokendo, Tokyo, pp 33–44 (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  16. Likens GE, Bormann FH, Johnson NM, Fisher DW, Pierce RS (1970) Effects of forest cutting and herbicide treatment on nutrient budgets in the Hubbard Brook watershed-ecosystem. Ecol Monogr 40:23–47CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. McIntyre RES, Adams MA, Ford DJ, Grierson PF (2009) Rewetting and litter addition influence mineralization and microbial communities in soils from a semi-arid intermittent stream. Soil Biol Biochem 41:92–101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Mecklenburg RA, Tukey HB, Morgan JV (1966) A mechanism for the leaching of calcium from foliage. Plant Physiol 41:610–613PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishers (2011) Summary of the results of 2010 World Agricultural Census (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.). Available at http://www.maff.go.jp/j/tokei/census/afc/about/pdf/kakutei_zentai.pdf. Accessed 31 Oct 2011
  20. Ministry of the Environment (2010) National strategy for biodiversity in 2010 (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.). Available at http://www.env.go.jp/press/file_view.php?serial=15315&hou_id=12273. Accessed 31 Oct 2011
  21. Miyazaki T, Hasegawa S, Kasubuchi T (2005) Soil Phys. Asakura, Tokyo (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  22. Nakamoto M, Sekioka H, Shimoda M, Morimoto Y (2002) The vegetation management of fallow rice paddies through periodical cultivation. J Jpn Inst Landsc Archit 65(5):585–590CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Nakashima M (1999) Terraced paddy fields in Japan. Kokinsyoin, Tokyo (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  24. Niigata Prefecture (1999) Land classification survey, Sado Island. The Office of Rural Community Environment in Niigata Prefecture, Niigata (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  25. Niigata Prefecture (2005) Promotion plans for reestablishment of Japanese crested ibis in the wild in Niigata Prefecture (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.). Available at http://www.pref.niigata.lg.jp/HTML_Article/gaiyou,33.pdf. Accessed 31 Oct 2011
  26. Nishihara S, Karube H, Washitani I (2006) Status and conservation of diving beetles inhabiting rice paddies. Jpn J Conserv Ecol 11:143–157 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  27. Ohrui K, Mitchell MJ, Bischoff JM (1999) Effect of landscape position on N mineralization and nitrification in a forested watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York. Can J For Res 29:497–508CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Oyanagi N, Nakata M (2010) Dynamics of dissolved ions in the soil of abandoned terraced paddy fields in Sado Island, Japan. Paddy Water Environ 8:121–129CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Oyanagi N, Nakata M, Matsuyama K, Tsujii N, Tsuchida T (2011) Factors affecting groundwater chemistry in abandoned terraced paddy fields on Sado Island, Japan. Irrigat Drain Rural Eng J 273:19–27 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  30. Ozawa M, Shibata H, Satoh F, Sasa K (2001) Effects of surface soil removal on dynamics of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in a snow-dominated forest. Sci World 1:527–533CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Raich JW, More G (2004) Estimating root plus rhizosphere contributions to soil respiration in annual croplands. Soil Sci Soc Am J 69:634–639CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Reddy KR, DeLaune RD (2008) Biogeochemistry of wetlands: science and applications. CRC Press, Boca RatonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Sato T, Seto M (1995) Relationship between the size of microbial biomass carbon and the amounts of mineral ions in arable and forest soils. Soil Microorg 46:51–59 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  34. Shimoda M, Nakamoto M (2003) Vegetation and threatened plant dynamics of wet abandoned rice fields in Nakaikemi, Fukui Prefecture, Japan. Jpn J Ecol 53:197–217 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  35. Tang Y, Wang L, Jia J, Fu X, Le Y, Chen X, Sun Y (2011) Response of soil microbial community in Jiuduansha wetland to different successional stages and its implications for soil microbial respiration and carbon turnover. Soil Biol Biochem 43:638–646CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Tsujii N, Nakata M (2006) Establishment of plant communities in relation to soil and water environments in abandoned terraced paddy fields on Sado Island, Japan. Veg Sci 23:37–54 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  37. Ueda T, Kinoshita E, Ishihara K (2004) Habitat use by the Tiny Dragonfly, Nannophya pygmaea RAMBUR, and conservation of its habitat in a hillside marsh. Jpn J Conserv Ecol 9:25–36 (in Japanese with English summary)Google Scholar
  38. Wood T, Bormann FH (1975) Increases in foliar leaching caused by acidification of an artificial mist. Ambio 4:169–171Google Scholar
  39. Yonebayashi K, Morishita T, Hattori T (1987) Annual fluctuation and its factor in nitrogen mineralization in paddy soils. Jpn J Soil Sci Plant Nutr 58:729–737 (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar
  40. Yoshioka R (1990) Landslide (4), Landslide and water-geochemical prospecting (No. 1). J Groundw Hydrol 32:147–162 (in Japanese)*. (*The titles are tentative translations from the original Japanese titles by the authors of this paper.)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Advanced Environmental Technology CenterEnvironmental Science Research NiigataNiigataJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Science and TechnologyNiigata UniversityNiigataJapan

Personalised recommendations