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Primates

, Volume 55, Issue 3, pp 377–382 | Cite as

Distribution and conservation status of Rhinopithecus strykeri in China

  • Ma Chi
  • Huang Zhi-Pang
  • Zhao Xiao-Fei
  • Zhang Li-Xiang
  • Sun Wen-Mo
  • Matthew B. Scott
  • Wang Xing-Wen
  • Cui Liang-WeiEmail author
  • Xiao WenEmail author
News and Perspectives

Abstract

This paper summarizes the results of 358 interviews we conducted on Rhinopithecus strykeri in the Gaoligong Mountains, northwest Yunnan, China, between April 2011 and December 2012. Based on our interview records and selective field surveys (47 days of field survey for seven possible distribution areas), we suggest that there may be up to 10 groups of R. strykeri occurring in China between the Salween River and the border with Myanmar, and that the total population of R. strykeri in China should be between 490 and 620 animals. According to interviewees, Rhinopithecus strykeri tends to use conifer and mixed conifer–broad-leaved forest, predominantly between 2,600 and 3,100 m above sea level. To better protect this globally threatened species, classified as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), we suggest extensions to current nature reserve boundaries to better include the home ranges of China’s remaining population.

Keywords

Distribution Conservation Snub-nosed monkey Rhinopithecus strykeri China 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The survey was funded by the Fauna & Flora International and Primate Action Fund, and partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30960085, 31260419). We are grateful to the Nujiang Forestry Department and the Gaoligongshan Nature Reserve for all the support they gave during the survey. We appreciate Frank Momberg, FFI, Asia Director for Programme Development, and Zhang Yingyi, FFI China Programme Director, who provided valuable recommendations.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre and Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ma Chi
    • 1
  • Huang Zhi-Pang
    • 1
  • Zhao Xiao-Fei
    • 1
  • Zhang Li-Xiang
    • 1
  • Sun Wen-Mo
    • 1
  • Matthew B. Scott
    • 1
  • Wang Xing-Wen
    • 2
  • Cui Liang-Wei
    • 3
    Email author
  • Xiao Wen
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Eastern-Himalaya Biodiversity ResearchDali UniversityDaliChina
  2. 2.Lushui Bureau of Gaoligongshan National Nature ReserveLushuiChina
  3. 3.Southwest Forestry UniversityKunmingChina

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