Primates

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 171–178

The positional behavior of pygmy marmosets (Cebuella pygmaea) in northwestern Bolivia

Original Article

Abstract

Pygmy marmosets are distinctive given their diminutive body size, their year-round reliance upon exudates, and their use of morphologically adapted tegulae to engage in a high degree of claw-clinging behaviors associated with exudate exploitation. This project examined the positional behavior and habitat preferences of one group of pygmy marmosets in a secondary forest within the Department of Pando, northwestern Bolivia. Results from this study indicate that pygmy marmosets primarily use claw-clinging during feeding (89.6%) with preferential use of large vertical trunks. Claw-clinging was also the dominant postural mode during exudate foraging (43.1%) with preferential use of large vertical trunks. Quadrupedalism was the dominant locomotor mode during travel (55.7%) with preferential use of bamboo and medium-sized substrates. These results support previous notions that claw-climbing is a solution to overcome the constraints of small body size while suggesting that quadrupedalism is a habitat-dependent locomotor mode.

Keywords

Pygmy marmosets Positional behavior Habitat use Habitat preference 

Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre and Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Northern Illinois UniversityDekalbUSA

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