Primates

, Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 97–104

Preliminary analysis of Nacholapithecus scapula and clavicle from Nachola, Kenya

  • Brigitte Senut
  • Masato Nakatsukasa
  • Yutaka Kunimatsu
  • Yoshihiko Nakano
  • Tomo Takano
  • Hiroshi Tsujikawa
  • Daisuke Shimizu
  • Miyuki Kagaya
  • Hidemi Ishida
Original Article

Abstract

The Miocene ape Nacholapithecus is known from rather complete skeletons; some of them preserve the shoulder joint, identified by three scapulae and one clavicle. Comparisons made with other Miocene and living apes (Proconsul, Equatorius, Ugandapithecus) suggest that the mobility of the scapulohumeral joint was important, and scapular features such as the morphology and position of the spine and the morphology of the acromion and axillary border resemble those of climbing arboreal primates except for chimpanzees, gorillas, or orang-utans. From the size of the scapula (male Nasalis size), it is clear that the animal is smaller than an adult chimpanzee, but the clavicle is almost as relatively long as those of chimpanzees. Some features closer to colobine morphology reinforce the hypothesis that Nacholapithecus was probably a good climber and was definitely adapted for an arboreal life.

Keywords

Scapula Clavicle Middle Miocene Nacholapithecus Kenya 

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre and Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brigitte Senut
    • 1
  • Masato Nakatsukasa
    • 2
  • Yutaka Kunimatsu
    • 3
  • Yoshihiko Nakano
    • 4
  • Tomo Takano
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Tsujikawa
    • 2
  • Daisuke Shimizu
    • 2
  • Miyuki Kagaya
    • 2
  • Hidemi Ishida
    • 2
  1. 1.Département d’Histoire de la Terre du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, UMR 5143 et PICS 1048CNRSParisFrance
  2. 2.Laboratory of Physical Anthropology, Graduate School of ScienceKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Biological Anthropology, Graduate School of Human SciencesOsaka UniversitySuitaJapan

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