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First report of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma solani’ associated with pepper chlorosis of sweet pepper, Capsicum annuum L., in Japan

  • Yoshifumi ShimomotoEmail author
  • Kenichi Ikeda
  • Yasushi Asahina
  • Kazutaka Yano
  • Misako Oka
  • Tomoka Oki
  • Junki Yamasaki
  • Shigeharu Takeuchi
  • Yasuaki Morita
Disease Note
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

In June 2017, sweet pepper plants showing chlorosis in leaves and fruits were observed in Susaki City, Kochi Prefecture, Japan. We had named the disease pepper chlorosis (Tairyoku-byo). A phytoplasma was observed by electron microscopy and identified as ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma solani’, based on homology searches and molecular phylogeny using nucleotide sequences of 16S rDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the occurrence of ‘Ca. P. solani’ in Japan.

Keywords

Candidatus phytoplasma solani’ Pepper chlorosis Sweet pepper 

Notes

Acknowledgment

We thank Dr. Shigetou Namba, The University of Tokyo, for helpful advice.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and animal rights

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshifumi Shimomoto
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kenichi Ikeda
    • 2
  • Yasushi Asahina
    • 1
  • Kazutaka Yano
    • 1
  • Misako Oka
    • 1
  • Tomoka Oki
    • 1
  • Junki Yamasaki
    • 1
  • Shigeharu Takeuchi
    • 1
  • Yasuaki Morita
    • 1
  1. 1.Kochi Agricultural Research CenterNankokuJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceKobe UniversityKobeJapan

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