Journal of General Plant Pathology

, Volume 81, Issue 6, pp 415–419 | Cite as

Protection induced by volatile limonene against anthracnose disease in Arabidopsis thaliana

  • Kayoko Fujioka
  • Haruko Gotoh
  • Taku Noumi
  • Ami Yoshida
  • Yoshiteru Noutoshi
  • Yoshishige Inagaki
  • Mikihiro Yamamoto
  • Yuki Ichinose
  • Tomonori Shiraishi
  • Kazuhiro Toyoda
Host Responses

Abstract

d-Limonene induces expression of PDF1.2 gene and resistance against Colletotrichum higginsianum in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. The limonene-induced expression of PDF1.2 was diminished in jar1-1 (jasmonate resistant 1-1) plants, indicating that the response of Arabidopsis depends on jasmonic acid (JA)-regulated defense signaling pathway. In fact, systemic induction of PDF1.2 was confirmed when the Arabidopsis plants harboring the PDF1.2 promotor::GUS were exposed to limonene. A similar protective effect was also observed on Japanese mustard spinach (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) challenged with C. higginsianum, suggesting that plants are capable of recognizing gaseous limonene and activate disease resistance.

Keywords

Arabidopsis thaliana Colletotrichum higginsianum d-Limonene Plant defensin (PDF1.2) Systemic resistance Volatile 

Supplementary material

10327_2015_621_MOESM1_ESM.docx (59 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1 Direct effect of gaseous limonene on fungal development on ethanol-killed onion epidermal cells. A conidial suspension of Colletotrichum higginsianum (5 µL of 105 spores/mL) was dropped onto the surface of ethanol-killed onion epidermal cells in a glass vessel continuously filled with or without limonene. At 2 days after inoculation (2 dpi), germination (purple), appressorial formation (blue) and successful penetrations (yellow) were counted using a light microscope (see Fig. 1 in the text). Typical fungal development on the ethanol-killed epidermal cells in the absence or presence of limonene is shown on the right. s conidial spore, ap appressorium, ih infection hyphae. Bar indicates 50 μm. (DOCX 58 kb)
10327_2015_621_MOESM2_ESM.docx (91 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 2 Limonene-induced protective effect against Colletotrichum higginsianum in Arabidopsisthaliana at 6 days after inoculation (dpi). Five-week-old seedlings were treated for 24 h with or without limonene (100 µmol/L). At 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment, six 5-µL drops of a conidial suspension (106 spores/mL) were placed on each leaf (DOCX 91 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kayoko Fujioka
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Haruko Gotoh
    • 3
  • Taku Noumi
    • 3
  • Ami Yoshida
    • 3
  • Yoshiteru Noutoshi
    • 1
  • Yoshishige Inagaki
    • 1
    • 4
  • Mikihiro Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Yuki Ichinose
    • 1
  • Tomonori Shiraishi
    • 1
    • 5
  • Kazuhiro Toyoda
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama UniversityOkayamaJapan
  2. 2.Okayama Prefectural Yakage Senior High SchoolOkayamaJapan
  3. 3.Okayama Prefectural Ibara Senior High SchoolIbaraJapan
  4. 4.Faculty of LiteratureKobe Women’s UniversityKobeJapan
  5. 5.Research Institute of Biological Sciences, OkayamaOkayamaJapan

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