Journal of General Plant Pathology

, Volume 81, Issue 4, pp 261–270 | Cite as

Cauliflower mosaic virus Tav protein induces leaf chlorosis in transgenic tobacco through a host response to virulence function of Tav

  • Sumyya Waliullah
  • Naomi Kosaka
  • Takashi Yaeno
  • Md. Emran Ali
  • Ken-Taro Sekine
  • Go Atsumi
  • Naoto Yamaoka
  • Masamichi Nishiguchi
  • Hideki Takahashi
  • Kappei Kobayashi
Host Responses

Abstract

To study the precise mechanisms underlying the chlorosis caused by plant viruses, we previously established a synchronous experimental system using transgenic plants expressing Cauliflower mosaic virus multifunctional protein, Tav (transactivator/viroplasmin), under the control of an artificially inducible promoter. Shortly after the induction of Tav expression, pathogenesis-related protein (PR) 1a gene expression is upregulated in the transgenic tobacco lines, which show visible chlorosis within a week. The present study showed that the expression of Tav also induces some salicylic acid (SA)- and ethylene-responsive PR genes. In contrast to transiently expressed Tav, which suppressed Agrobacterium-induced and SA-induced PR1a expression, the artificial induction of Tav from the transgene did not affect SA-induced PR1a expression, rather it alone induced PR1a expression. In a deletion analysis, chlorosis and PR1a induction function in transgenic tobacco were mapped to a region in Tav that had been shown to have a role in pathogenesis in a susceptible host, elicitation of the hypersensitive response in a resistant host, suppression of RNA silencing, and the suppression of Tomato bushy stunt virus P19-mediated cell death in tobacco. The results suggest that Tav-induced chlorosis results from a host response, which accompanies PR1a induction, to pathogenic function of Tav.

Keywords

Cauliflower mosaic virus Chlorosis Defense Host response Pathogenesis PR-protein 

Supplementary material

10327_2015_600_MOESM1_ESM.docx (24 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 23 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sumyya Waliullah
    • 1
  • Naomi Kosaka
    • 2
  • Takashi Yaeno
    • 1
    • 2
  • Md. Emran Ali
    • 2
  • Ken-Taro Sekine
    • 3
  • Go Atsumi
    • 3
  • Naoto Yamaoka
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masamichi Nishiguchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hideki Takahashi
    • 4
  • Kappei Kobayashi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The United Graduate School of Agricultural SciencesEhime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureEhime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan
  3. 3.Iwate Biotechnology Research CenterKitakamiJapan
  4. 4.Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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