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Journal of General Plant Pathology

, Volume 78, Issue 2, pp 136–139 | Cite as

First report of fig mosaic virus infecting common fig (Ficus carica) in Japan

  • Kazuya Ishikawa
  • Kensaku Maejima
  • Susumu Nagashima
  • Nobuo Sawamura
  • Yusuke Takinami
  • Ken Komatsu
  • Masayoshi Hashimoto
  • Yasuyuki Yamaji
  • Jun Yamamoto
  • Shigetou Namba
Disease note

Abstract

For the first time, fig mosaic virus (FMV) was detected in common fig (Ficus carica) trees in Shimane, Japan. These trees exhibited mosaic, ringspots, or distortion, accompanied by chlorosis on leaves and yellow spots on fruits. Some of the symptomatic trees were infested with the eriophyid mite Aceria ficus. The virus was detected based on RT-PCR, followed by sequencing. The amplified 300 base-pair fragments shared 83.5–91.5% identity with the corresponding region of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of FMV isolates previously reported in Turkey, Iran, and Italy.

Keywords

Common fig Ficus carica L. Fig mosaic disease (FMD) Fig mosaic virus (FMV) 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Program for Promotion of Basic Research Activities for Innovative Bioscience (PROBRAIN).

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Copyright information

© The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuya Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Kensaku Maejima
    • 1
  • Susumu Nagashima
    • 2
  • Nobuo Sawamura
    • 2
  • Yusuke Takinami
    • 1
  • Ken Komatsu
    • 1
  • Masayoshi Hashimoto
    • 1
  • Yasuyuki Yamaji
    • 1
  • Jun Yamamoto
    • 2
  • Shigetou Namba
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Shimane Agricultural Technology CenterIzumoJapan

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