Environmental Chemistry Letters

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 1–17

Field crops for phytoremediation of metal-contaminated land. A review

  • Teofilo Vamerali
  • Marianna Bandiera
  • Giuliano Mosca
Review

Abstract

The use of higher plants to remediate contaminated land is known as phytoremediation, a term coined 15 years ago. Among green technologies addressed to metal pollution, phytoextraction has received increasing attention starting from the discovery of hyperaccumulator plants, which are able to concentrate high levels of specific metals in the above-ground harvestable biomass. The small shoot and root growth of these plants and the absence of their commercially available seeds have stimulated study on biomass species, including herbaceous field crops. We review here the results of a bibliographical survey from 1995 to 2009 in CAB abstracts on phytoremediation and heavy metals for crop species, citations of which have greatly increased, especially after 2001. Apart from the most frequently cited Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., which is often referred to as an hyperaccumulator of various metals, studies mainly focus on Helianthus annuus L., Zea mays L. and Brassica napus L., the last also having the greatest annual increase in number of citations. Field crops may compensate their low metal concentration by a greater biomass yield, but available data from in situ experiments are currently very few. The use of amendments or chelators is often tested in the field to improve metal recovery, allowing above-normal concentrations to be reached. Values for Zn exceeding 1,000 mg kg−1 are found in Brassica spp., Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Zea mays, and Cu higher than 500 mg kg−1 in Zea mays, Phaseolus vulgaris and Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. Lead greater than 1,000 mg kg−1 is measured in Festuca spp. and various Fabaceae. Arsenic has values higher than 200 mg kg−1 in sorghum and soybean, whereas Cd concentrations are generally lower than 50 mg kg−1. Assisted phytoextraction is currently facilitated by the availability of low-toxic and highly degradable chelators, such as EDDS and nitrilotriacetate. Currently, several experimental attempts are being made to improve plant growth and metal uptake, and results are being achieved from the application of organic acids, auxins, humic acids and mycorrhization. The phytoremediation efficiency of field crops is rarely high, but their greater growth potential compared with hyperaccumulators should be considered positively, in that they can establish a dense green canopy in polluted soil, improving the landscape and reducing the mobility of pollutants through water, wind erosion and water percolation.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teofilo Vamerali
    • 1
  • Marianna Bandiera
    • 2
  • Giuliano Mosca
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental SciencesUniversity of ParmaParmaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Agronomy and Crop SciencesUniversity of PadovaLegnaro, PadovaItaly

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