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Environmental Chemistry Letters

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 223–227 | Cite as

Analyses of cyanobacterial toxins (microcystins, cylindrospermopsin) in the reservoirs of the Czech Republic and evaluation of health risks

  • Lucie Bláhová
  • Pavel Babica
  • Ondřej Adamovský
  • Jiří Kohoutek
  • Blahoslav Maršálek
  • Luděk BláhaEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Massive cyanobacterial water blooms and production of toxins (cyanotoxins) have become a worldwide problem. In this report, we present results of cyanotoxins analyses (peptide microcystins, alkaloid cylindrospermopsin) in the Czech Republic reservoirs using HPLC-PDA and ELISA. Our study suggests the occurrence of cylindrospermopsin in the Czech Republic for the first time (particularly, in water blooms containing Aphanizomenon klebahnii). We also discuss human health risks associated with microcystins in relation to the drinking water guideline value of 1.0 μg/l as recommended by the World Health Organization.

Keywords

Cyanotoxins Microcystin Cylindrospermopsin Blue-green algae Toxic cyanobacterial blooms Health risks 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research was supported by the Ministry of Education CR projects IM6798593909 (“Research Centre for Bioindication and Revitalization”) and 0021622412 (“INCHEMBIOL”).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucie Bláhová
    • 1
  • Pavel Babica
    • 1
  • Ondřej Adamovský
    • 1
  • Jiří Kohoutek
    • 1
  • Blahoslav Maršálek
    • 1
  • Luděk Bláha
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Centre for Cyanobacteria and their Toxins, Institute of Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences and RECETOXMasaryk UnivesityBrnoCzech Republic

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