Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology

, Volume 37, Issue 12, pp 1257–1261 | Cite as

Chemostat-induced uneven division of Bacillus subtilis

Original Paper

Abstract

Anomalous forms of Bacillus subtilis A32 produced by prolonged cultivation in a chemostat under nitrogen limitation are described. A change in the cultivation conditions brought about a transformation of these forms to bacillar rods. The transformation was gradual and lasted for several generations.

Keywords

Chemostat Bacillus subtilis Defective division Ultrathin sections 

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Copyright information

© Society for Industrial Microbiology 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyInstitute of Chemical Technology PraguePrague 6Czech Republic

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