Chromium recycling of tannery waste through microbial fermentation

  • E. A. Katsifas
  • E. Giannoutsou
  • M. Lambraki
  • M. Barla
  • A. D. Karagouni
Original Paper

Abstract

An Aspergillus carbonarius isolate, selected from an established microbial culture collection, was used to study the biodegradation of chromium shavings in solid-state fermentation experiments. Approximately 97% liquefaction of the tannery waste was achieved and the liquid obtained from long-term experiments was used to recover chromium. The resulting alkaline chromium sulfate solution was useful in tanning procedures. A proteinaceous liquid was also obtained which has potential applications as a fertilizer or animal feed additive and has several other industrial uses. The A. carbonarius strain proved to be a very useful tool in tannery waste-treatment processes and chromium recovery in the tanning industries.

Keywords

Tannery wastes Aspergillus carbonarius Chromium recycling Solid-state fermentation Bioremediation 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors acknowledge support from the Hellenic Ministry of the Environment, Physical Planning and Public Works (grant ETERPS, 70/3/4391).

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Copyright information

© Society for Industrial Microbiology 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Katsifas
    • 1
  • E. Giannoutsou
    • 1
  • M. Lambraki
    • 1
  • M. Barla
    • 2
  • A. D. Karagouni
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany, Faculty of BiologyUniversity of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.ELKEDE Technology and Design Center S.A.AthensGreece

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