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Clinical Autonomic Research

, Volume 21, Issue 6, pp 419–423 | Cite as

Fludrocortisone improves nausea in children with orthostatic intolerance (OI)

  • John E. Fortunato
  • Hossam A. Shaltout
  • Megan M. Larkin
  • Peter C. Rowe
  • Debra I. Diz
  • Kenneth L. Koch
Short Communication

Abstract

Introduction/Results

In 17 patients, chronic idiopathic nausea was associated with orthostatic intolerance (OI) by abnormal tilt table tests (88%) or gastric dysrhythmias (71%). After fludrocortisone treatment, there was >26% nausea improvement in 71%, 1–25% in 6%, and no improvement in 24%. In six subjects, EGGs repeated after >50% nausea improvement all remained to be abnormal, suggesting nausea is independent of gastric dysrhythmias.

Conclusion

Association of EGG abnormalities and OI in this subset of nausea patients suggests a generalized disturbance of autonomic regulation.

Keywords

Fludrocortisone acetate chronic idiopathic nausea Orthostatic intolerance (OI) Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) Neurally mediated hypotension (NMH) Electrogastrography Tilt table testing 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Fortunato
    • 1
  • Hossam A. Shaltout
    • 2
    • 3
  • Megan M. Larkin
    • 1
  • Peter C. Rowe
    • 4
  • Debra I. Diz
    • 2
  • Kenneth L. Koch
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Wake Forest University School of MedicineWake Forest University Medical Center BlvdWinston-SalemUSA
  2. 2.Hypertension and Vascular Disease CenterWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology, School of PharmacyAlexandria UniversityAlexandriaEgypt
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Department of Internal Medicine, Section on GastroenterologyWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA

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