Journal of Digital Imaging

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 279–284 | Cite as

Quality Assurance of Clinical MRI Scanners Using ACR MRI Phantom: Preliminary Results

  • Chien-Chuan Chen
  • Yung-Liang Wan
  • Yau-Yau Wai
  • Ho-Ling Liu
Article

Abstract

Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners play an important role in the diagnosis of diseases and management of patient treatment. Quality assurance (QA) of the clinical MRI scanners is mandatory to obtain optimal images in a modern hospital. In this report, the phantom test for the American College of Radiology (ACR) MRI accreditation is used as the essential part of the MRI QA protocols. Seven important assessments of MR image quality are included as follows: geometric accuracy, high-contrast resolution, slice thickness accuracy, slice position accuracy, image intensity uniformity, percent signal ghosting, and low-contrast object detectability. In addition, signal-to-noise ratio and central frequency are monitored as well. The MRI QA procedures were applied to four clinical MRI scanners in our institute twice within 3 months. According to the QA results, the service engineers were more efficient in solving scanners problems when the ACR phantom test was run.

Keywords

MRI quality assurance ACR phantom image quality 

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Copyright information

© SCAR (Society for Computer Applications in Radiology) 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chien-Chuan Chen
    • 1
  • Yung-Liang Wan
    • 1
  • Yau-Yau Wai
    • 1
  • Ho-Ling Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.MRI Center, Department of Diagnostic RadiologyChang Gung Memorial Hospital; School of Medical Technology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung UniversityTaoyuanTaiwan

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