Journal of Digital Imaging

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 270–279 | Cite as

Assessment of a Novel, High-Resolution, Color, AMLCD for Diagnostic Medical Image Display: Luminance Performance and DICOM Calibration

  • Alice N. Averbukh
  • David S. Channin
  • Michael J. Flynn
Article

Abstract

This article documents the results of the first in a series of experiments designed to evaluate the suitability of a novel, high resolution, color, digital, liquid crystal display (LCD) panel for diagnostic quality, gray scale image display. The goal of this experiment was to measure the performance of the display, especially with respect to luminance. The panel evaluated was the IBM T221 22.2” backlit active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) with native resolution of 3840 × 2400 pixels. Taking advantage of the color capabilities of the workstation, we were able to create a 256-entry grayscale calibration look-up table derived from a palette of 1786 nearly gray luminance values. We also constructed a 256-entry grayscale calibration look-up table derived from a palette of 256 true gray values for which the red, green, and blue values were equal. These calibrations will now be used in our evaluation of human contrast-detail perception on this LCD panel.

Keywords

PACS image display AMLCD evaluation DICOM Part 14 calibration 

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Copyright information

© SCAR (Society for Computer Applications in Radiology) 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alice N. Averbukh
    • 1
  • David S. Channin
    • 1
  • Michael J. Flynn
    • 2
  1. 1.Northwestern University Medical School, 448 E. Ontario Suite 300 Chicago, IL 60611USA
  2. 2.Henry Ford Health System, 1 Ford Place, Detroit, MI 48202USA

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