Mycoscience

, Volume 53, Issue 6, pp 446–459 | Cite as

Bristle-like fungal colonizers on the stone walls of the Kitora and Takamatsuzuka Tumuli are identified as Kendrickiella phycomyces

  • Tomohiko Kiyuna
  • Kwang-Deuk An
  • Rika Kigawa
  • Chie Sano
  • Sadatoshi Miura
  • Junta Sugiyama
Full Paper
  • 271 Downloads

Abstract

Using an integrated analysis of phenotypic and genotypic characterizations, a total of 18 isolates of “bristle-like” fungal colonizers of the Kitora and Takamatsuzuka Tumuli, which had been provisionally identified as Phialocephala phycomyces, were here determined to be Kendrickiella phycomyces (Auersw.) K. Jacobs & M. J. Wingf. The 18 isolates consisted of 10 from stone surfaces or viscous gels (biofilms) of the stone chamber interior and adjacent small room, and air in the adjacent small room of the Kitora Tumulus, and 8 from viscous gels on the stone surfaces of the stone chamber interior, plant roots, and soil in the adjacent space or stone wall interspaces (interstices) in the stone chamber of the Takamatsuzuka Tumulus. Plaster and stone walls in both tumuli were recorded as novel substrates of this fungus. Our 18S sequence-based phylogeny indicated that K. phycomyces and species of the leotiomycetous anamorph genera Chaetomella, Pilidium, Sphaerographium, and Synchaetomella formed a monophyletic lineage distant from the core taxa of the Leotiomycetes (Pezizomycotina, Ascomycota). The relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of these isolates on GYC agar plates, i.e., soluble brownish pigments and dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), and the biodeterioration of the plaster and plaster walls of both tumuli, are briefly discussed.

Keywords

Biodeterioration CaCO3 solubilization Cultural properties Kendrickiella phycomyces Molecular systematics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Our studies and the reproduction of the portions of the photographs shown in Fig. 5 were permitted by the Agency for Cultural Affairs, Japan. We are grateful to the curators of Mycothèque de l’Université catholique de Louvain (MUCL) in Belgium, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) in Utrecht and NITE-Bioresource Center (NBRC) in Kazusa for providing the strains of Phialocephala spp. The critical comments from two anonymous reviewers helped in improving the manuscript. This study was financially supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) (No. 17206060 to S. Miura, 2005–2007; No. 19200057 to C. Sano, 2007–2010) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

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Copyright information

© The Mycological Society of Japan and Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomohiko Kiyuna
    • 1
  • Kwang-Deuk An
    • 1
    • 4
  • Rika Kigawa
    • 2
  • Chie Sano
    • 2
  • Sadatoshi Miura
    • 2
  • Junta Sugiyama
    • 3
  1. 1.NCIMB Group, TechnoSuruga Laboratory Co., Ltd.ShizuokaJapan
  2. 2.Independent Administrative InstitutionNational Research Institute for Cultural Properties, TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.TechnoSuruga Laboratory Co., Ltd., Chiba Branch Office and LabFunabashiJapan
  4. 4.Microbe Division/Japan Collection of MicroorganismsRIKEN BioResource CenterWakoJapan

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