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Odontology

, Volume 102, Issue 1, pp 14–21 | Cite as

The influence of electrospun fibre scaffold orientation and nano-hydroxyapatite content on the development of tooth bud stem cells in vitro

  • Elisabeth H. C. van Manen
  • Weibo Zhang
  • X. Frank Walboomers
  • Betsy Vazquez
  • Fang Yang
  • Wei Ji
  • Na Yu
  • Daisy J. Spear
  • John A. JansenEmail author
  • Pamela C. Yelick
Original Article

Abstract

In stem cell-based dental tissue engineering, the goal is to create tooth-like structures using scaffold materials to guide the dental stem cells. In this study, the effect of fiber alignment and hydroxyapatite content in biodegradable electrospun PLGA scaffolds have been investigated. Fiber orientation of the scaffolds was random or aligned in bundles. For scaffolds with prefabricated orientation, scaffolds were fabricated from PLGA polymer solution containing 0, 10 or 20 % nano-hydroxyapatite. The scaffolds were seeded with porcine cells isolated from tooth buds (dental mesenchymal, dental epithelial, and mixed dental mesenchymal/epithelial cells). Samples were collected at 1, 3 and 6 weeks. Analyses were performed for cell proliferation, ALP activity, and cell morphology. Fiber alignment showed an effect on cell orientation in the first week after cell seeding, but had no long-term effect on cell alignment or organized calcified matrix deposition once the cells reach confluency. Scaffold porosity was sufficient to allow migration of mesenchymal cells. Hydroxyapatite incorporation did not have a positive effect on cell proliferation, especially of epithelial cells, but seemed to promote differentiation. Concluding, scaffold architecture is important to mesenchymal cell morphology, but has no long-term effect on cell alignment or organized ECM deposition. nHA incorporation does have an effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and ECM production, and should be regarded as a bioactive component of dental bioengineered scaffolds.

Keywords

Dental tissue engineering Tooth bud stem cells Electrospinning Hydroxyapatite PLGA 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to acknowledge the support received from the Radboud University (EHCVM), and NIH/NIDCR grant DE016132-06 (PCY).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Society of The Nippon Dental University 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth H. C. van Manen
    • 1
  • Weibo Zhang
    • 2
  • X. Frank Walboomers
    • 1
  • Betsy Vazquez
    • 2
  • Fang Yang
    • 1
  • Wei Ji
    • 1
  • Na Yu
    • 1
  • Daisy J. Spear
    • 2
  • John A. Jansen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pamela C. Yelick
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiomaterialsRadboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre 309 PBNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Division of Tissue Engineering, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial PathologyTufts University School of Dental MedicineBostonUSA

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