Journal of Plant Research

, 122:633

DEAR1, a transcriptional repressor of DREB protein that mediates plant defense and freezing stress responses in Arabidopsis

  • Tomokazu Tsutsui
  • Wataru Kato
  • Yutaka Asada
  • Kaori Sako
  • Takeo Sato
  • Yutaka Sonoda
  • Satoshi Kidokoro
  • Kazuko Yamaguchi-Shinozaki
  • Masanori Tamaoki
  • Keita Arakawa
  • Takanari Ichikawa
  • Miki Nakazawa
  • Motoaki Seki
  • Kazuo Shinozaki
  • Minami Matsui
  • Akira Ikeda
  • Junji Yamaguchi
Regular Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10265-009-0252-6

Cite this article as:
Tsutsui, T., Kato, W., Asada, Y. et al. J Plant Res (2009) 122: 633. doi:10.1007/s10265-009-0252-6

Abstract

Plants have evolved intricate mechanisms to respond and adapt to a wide variety of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment. The Arabidopsis DEAR1 (DREB and EAR motif protein 1; At3g50260) gene encodes a protein containing significant homology to the DREB1/CBF (dehydration-responsive element binding protein 1/C-repeat binding factor) domain and the EAR (ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression) motif. We show here that DEAR1 mRNA accumulates in response to both pathogen infection and cold treatment. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) showed a dwarf phenotype and lesion-like cell death, together with constitutive expression of PR genes and accumulation of salicylic acid. DEAR1ox also showed more limited P. syringae pathogen growth compared to wild-type, consistent with an activated defense phenotype. In addition, transient expression experiments revealed that the DEAR1 protein represses DRE/CRT (dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat)-dependent transcription, which is regulated by low temperature. Furthermore, the induction of DREB1/CBF family genes by cold treatment was suppressed in DEAR1ox, leading to a reduction in freezing tolerance. These results suggest that DEAR1 has an upstream regulatory role in mediating crosstalk between signaling pathways for biotic and abiotic stress responses.

Keywords

Arabidopsis DREB1/CBF family Biotic stress Abiotic stress Salicylic acid EAR motif 

Supplementary material

10265_2009_252_MOESM1_ESM.doc (80 kb)
Tables S1 and S2 (DOC 80 kb)
10265_2009_252_MOESM2_ESM.tif (68 kb)
Fig. S1. Phylogenetic Tree of DEAR Family. A multiple-sequence alignment constructed with Clustal W is displayed using Tree View (Morita-Yamamuro et al. 2005). Sequences were obtained from GenBank, and accession numbers are as follows: Arabidopsis thaliana (DEAR1), Q9SNE1; Arabidopsis thaliana (DEAR2), Q9FH94; Arabidopsis thaliana (DEAR3), O22174; Arabidopsis thaliana (DEAR4), ABF83647; Arabidopsis thaliana (DEAR5), ABD57514; Arabidopsis thaliana (DEAR6), ABD57516; Oryza sativa (Os04g0648900), NP_001054079; Oryza sativa (Os06g0166400), NP_001056914; Triticum aestivum, AAY98505; Vitis vinifera, AAZ74793; Vitis vinifera, CAO61384; Gossypium hirsutum, AAO43165; Glycine max, ABB36645; Glycine max, AAP47161. The scale represents 0.1 substitutions per site. (TIFF 67 kb)
10265_2009_252_MOESM3_ESM.tif (1 mb)
Fig. S2. Characterization of 35S::DEAR1 and DEAR1ox Transgenic Lines.(a) Morphology of 4-week-old wild-type Col-0 (WT), 35S::DEAR1 and DEAR1ox plants. Bar = 1 cm.(b) Overexpression of DEAR1 gene in 35S::DEAR1 and DEAR1ox plants. Total RNA from 4-week-old vegetative shoot tissue of wild-type (WT), 35S::DEAR1 and DEAR1ox was analyzed by RT-PCR. EF1α was used as a control.(c) Imaging DEAR1::GFP in DEAR1ox. Epi-fluorescence microscope images by Bright field and GFP epi-fluorescence images of root from the transgenic plant for the 35S::GFP and DEAR1ox. Bar = 200 μm. (TIFF 1044 kb)
10265_2009_252_MOESM4_ESM.tif (344 kb)
Fig. S3. Expression Profiles of DEAR1 in Response to Various Abiotic Stresses.Expression profiles of DEAR1 in wild-type plants during cold (closed circle; sky blue), osmotic (closed square; yellow), salt (closed triangle; light blue), drought (asterisk; red), oxidative (open diamond; light green), UV-B (open circle; light purple), wounding (open square; aquamarine) and heat (open triangle; orange) stresses. No stress exposure is as also shown as a control (closed diamond; black). Data was compiled from microarray data available in the Arabidopsis eFP Browser (http://bar.utoronto.ca/efp/cgi-bin/efpWeb.cgi). (TIFF 344 kb)
10265_2009_252_MOESM5_ESM.tif (256 kb)
Fig. S4. Expression Profiles of DEAR1 in Response to Pathogen Infection.(a) Expression of DEAR1 in wild-type plants following infection with P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (closed square; orange) and 10 mM MgCl2 as a mock control (closed diamond; black). Data was compiled from microarray data available in the Arabidopsis eFP Browser (http://bar.utoronto.ca/efp/cgi-bin/efpWeb.cgi).(b) Expression of DEAR1 in wild-type plants following infection with B. cinerea (closed square; orange) and potato dextrose broth as a mock control (closed diamond; black). Data was compiled from microarray data available in the Arabidopsis eFP Browser (http://bar.utoronto.ca/efp/cgi-bin/efpWeb.cgi). (TIFF 256 kb)

Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Japan and Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomokazu Tsutsui
    • 1
  • Wataru Kato
    • 1
  • Yutaka Asada
    • 1
  • Kaori Sako
    • 1
  • Takeo Sato
    • 1
  • Yutaka Sonoda
    • 1
  • Satoshi Kidokoro
    • 2
  • Kazuko Yamaguchi-Shinozaki
    • 2
    • 3
  • Masanori Tamaoki
    • 4
  • Keita Arakawa
    • 5
  • Takanari Ichikawa
    • 6
  • Miki Nakazawa
    • 6
  • Motoaki Seki
    • 7
  • Kazuo Shinozaki
    • 6
  • Minami Matsui
    • 6
  • Akira Ikeda
    • 1
  • Junji Yamaguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Graduate School of Life ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Biological Resources DivisionJapan International Research Center for Agricultural SciencesTsukubaJapan
  4. 4.Biodiversity Conservation Research ProjectNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan
  5. 5.Graduate School of AgricultureHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  6. 6.Plant Functional Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Plant Science Center (PSC), RIKENYokohama InstituteYokohamaJapan
  7. 7.Plant Genomic Network Research Group, RIKEN Plant Science Center (PSC), RIKENYokohama InstituteYokohamaJapan

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