Journal of Plant Research

, Volume 119, Issue 4, pp 415–417 | Cite as

An improved technique for isolating codominant compound microsatellite markers

  • Chunlan L. Lian
  • Md. Abdul Wadud
  • Qifang Geng
  • Kenichiro Shimatani
  • Taizo Hogetsu
Technical Note

Abstract

An approach for developing codominant polymorphic markers (compound microsatellite (SSR) markers), with substantial time and cost savings, is introduced in this paper. In this technique, fragments flanked by a compound SSR sequence at one end were amplified from the constructed DNA library using compound SSR primer (AC)6(AG)5 or (TC)6(AC)5 and an adaptor primer for the suppression-PCR. A locus-specific primer was designed from the sequence flanking the compound SSR. The primer pairs of the locus-specific and compound SSR primers were used as a compound SSR marker. Because only one locus-specific primer was needed for design of each marker and only a common compound SSR primer was needed as the fluorescence-labeled primer for analyzing all the compound SSR markers, this approach substantially reduced the cost of developing codominant markers and analyzing their polymorphism. We have demonstrated this technique for Dendropanax trifidus and easily developed 11 codominant markers with high polymorphism for D. trifidus. Use of the technique for successful isolation of codominant compound SSR markers for several other plant species is currently in progress.

Keywords

Development DNA marker Microsatellites Polymorphism Simple sequence repeat 

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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Japan and Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chunlan L. Lian
    • 1
  • Md. Abdul Wadud
    • 2
  • Qifang Geng
    • 1
  • Kenichiro Shimatani
    • 3
  • Taizo Hogetsu
    • 2
  1. 1.Asian Natural Environmental Science CenterThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.The Institute of Statistical MathematicsTokyoJapan

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