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Effects of uniaxial cyclic strain on adipose-derived stem cell morphology, proliferation, and differentiation

  • Wen-Chi C. Lee
  • Timothy M. Maul
  • David A. Vorp
  • J. P. Rubin
  • Kacey G. Marra
Original Paper

Abstract

Cells and tissues in vivo are subjected to various forms of mechanical forces that are essential to their normal development and functions. The arterial blood vessel wall is continuously exposed to mechanical stresses such as pressure, strain, and shear due to the pulsatile nature of blood flow. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) populate the media of blood vessels and play important roles in the control of vasoactivity and the remodeling of the vessel wall. It is well documented that the phenotype and functions of vascular SMCs are not only regulated by chemical factors such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), but also by mechanical factors such as uniaxial strain. The purpose of our study was to explore the effects of TGF-β1 alone or in combination with uniaxial cyclic strain on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. Low passage ASCs were stimulated with 10% strain at 1 Hz for 7 days, with or without TGF-β1. Cyclic strain inhibited proliferation, and caused alignment of the cells and of the F-actin cytoskeleton perpendicular to the direction of strain. Strain alone resulted in a decrease in the expression of early SMC markers α-SMA and h 1-calponin. While the response of SMCs and other progenitor cells such as bone marrow stromal cells to mechanical forces has been extensively studied, the roles of these forces on ASCs remain unexplored. This work advances our understanding of the mechanical regulation of ASCs.

Keywords

Mechanical Strain Cyclic Strain Human Adipose Tissue Uniaxial Strain Vascular SMCs 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wen-Chi C. Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Timothy M. Maul
    • 2
    • 3
  • David A. Vorp
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • J. P. Rubin
    • 1
    • 4
  • Kacey G. Marra
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Plastic Surgery Research Laboratory, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of SurgeryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of BioengineeringUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of SurgeryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.McGowan Institute for Regenerative MedicineUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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