Ocean Dynamics

, Volume 66, Issue 2, pp 163–172 | Cite as

Dichothermal layer deepening in relation with halocline depth change associated with northward shrinkage of North Pacific western subarctic gyre in early 2000s

Article

Abstract

In the western subarctic North Pacific, a wind-driven cyclonic circulation, called the western subarctic gyre (WSAG), exists. We examined year-to-year changes of the gyre and hydrographic structures, applying the altimetry-based gravest empirical mode (AGEM) method to hydrographic and altimetric sea surface height (SSH) data, and relation to the in situ variation of the temperature minimum layer, i.e., the dichothermal layer, depth at station K2 (47 N, 160 E). The AGEM-based geostrophic volume transport and the streamfunction of the WSAG in the top 1000-dbar layer show that the gyre changes substantially. From the late 1990s to the mid-2000s, the gyre shrunk northward. Due to the shrinkage, the halocline bottom, which is equivalent to the top of the main pycnocline, deepens at K2 outside the central part of the gyre. The downward displacement of the dichothermal layer at K2 was found to be significantly related to that of the underlying halocline due to the northward shrinkage of the WSAG.

Keywords

North Pacific western subarctic gyre Halocline Dichothermal layer K2 Hydrography Satellite altimetry AGEM 

1 Introduction

In the western subarctic North Pacific, a temperature minimum layer, called the dichothermal layer, exists in a layer between 100 and 200 m just above the main pycnocline (Dodimead et al. 1963; Favorite et al. 1976) and is occupied by the remnant of the mixed layer water from the preceding winter (e.g., Miura et al. 2002; Wakita et al. 2010, 2013). Wakita et al. (2010, 2013) reported a decadal variation of the dichothermal layer depth at stations KNOT (44 N, 155 E) and K2 (47 N, 160 E) in the western subarctic region from 1997 to 2011.

A regional cyclonic circulation, called the western subarctic gyre (WSAG), is embedded in the western part of the basin-scale subarctic cyclonic circulation (Dodimead et al. 1963; Favorite et al. 1976; Nagata et al. 1992). The WSAG involves the southwestward flowing western boundary current along the eastern coasts of the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands (called the East Kamchatka Current or the upstream of the Oyashio), and the northeastward weak and wide return current in the North Pacific central region (Fig. 1a, b). The main pycnocline shoals toward the center of the WSAG (Miura et al. 2002) characterized by the minimum in sea surface dynamic height (Fig. 1a).

Fig. 1

a Climatological sea surface dynamic height (m) in the North Pacific relative to 1000 dbar based on the World Ocean Atlas 2005. Contour interval of sea surface dynamic height is 0.1 m. b Schematic of typical sea surface flow (arrows) in the western subarctic North Pacific. Locations of stations K2 and KNOT are indicated by stars

The variations of the subarctic circulations have been suggested to be caused by the change of wind stress curl field over the whole subarctic region (e.g., Sekine 1999; Qiu 2002; Kuroda et al. 2015). Recently, Kuroda et al. (2015) suggested a northward migration of the southern border of the Oyashio just southeast of Hokkaido, Japan, from the 1990s to the 2000s, which is presumably related to the long-term change of the basin-scale subarctic circulation caused by the change of the wind stress curl field. The variations of the intensity, extension, and shape of the circulations through the change of Ekman suction can yield the vertical displacement of the main pycnocline.

Because the strong density stratification in the main pycnocline prevents vertical mixing, the penetration of the developing winter mixed layer would be inhibited by the main pycnocline, as suggested by Miura et al. (2002, 2003). In other words, the depth of the main pycnocline would govern the potential maximal depth of the winter mixed layer, i.e., the dichothermal layer, in condition that the winter mixed layer develops sufficiently. If this suggestion by Miura et al. (2002, 2003) is valid in the real ocean, the variation of the main pycnocline depth due to the variation of the WSAG is identical to that of the dichothermal layer depth. However, because of a low spatial resolution and limited number of hydrographic observations in the western subarctic North Pacific by research vessels, the relationship between the variations of the WSAG and the dichothermal layer depth has never been verified yet by using time series data.

For the examination of changes of the horizontal and vertical features of the WSAG, data must be collected densely over a sufficiently broad area and its length must also be long. The Argo project was initiated in 2000, but until fairly recently, few Argo observations were performed in the western subarctic North Pacific region; therefore, the Argo data are not available for the examination of the long-term variation of the dichothermal layer shown by Wakita et al. (2010, 2013). Observations of the global sea surface height (SSH) have been performed with satellite altimeters, with resolution sufficiently fine to identify differences in the variations of circulations, as demonstrated by Nagano et al. (2013) in the Kuroshio region south of Japan and other regions. In particular, at high latitude regions, satellite tracks are closer to one another, and the horizontal resolution has been very high since the initial year of the observation by TOPEX/Poseidon (Ducet et al. 2000).

At present, altimetric observations of SSH have been conducted for more than a decade, and these data are available for investigating the interannual or longer timescale variations. In addition, hydrographic data were collected at and around the K2 and KNOT stations. Altimetric SSH variation principally consists of the baroclinic component associated with the variation of the main pycnocline depth (e.g., Kakinoki et al. 2008; Nagano et al. 2013). Other contributions such as the barotropic component and the near-surface thermal expansion are generally much smaller for year-to-year variations. By adopting the altimeter-derived gravest empirical mode (AGEM) method, temporal variations of the main pycnocline depth and the geostrophic volume transport can be estimated from altimetric SSH and hydrographic data, as Sun and Watts (2001), and others have applied in high-latitude areas where salinity is the dominant factor controlling the potential density and its variation is perceptible by altimetric SSH. We expect that the combined use of altimetric SSH and hydrographic data in the western subarctic North Pacific will make it possible to elucidate the variation of the vertical feature of the WSAG in addition to that of the horizontal feature.

In this study, we examine the variation of the WSAG on the basis of SSH, AGEM-based hydrographic structures, geostrophic volume transport and streamfunction of the gyre, and the relationship to the depth of dichothermal layer at station K2. After describing altimetric SSH and hydrographic data and the AGEM method in Section 2, we show the variation of the WSAG by the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) of SSH between 1992 and 2010 in Section 3. In Section 4, we estimate the temporal variations of the geostrophic volume transport and streamfunction of the WSAG by combining the SSH and conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data using the AGEM method, and the depth of the halocline bottom, which is equivalent to the top of the main pycnocline, at K2, and identify the relationship between the variation of the halocline bottom depth associated with the gyre change and that of the in situ dichothermal layer depth. A summary and conclusion of our results are provided in Section 5.

2 Data and method

We collected weekly SSH anomaly data during 1992–2010 from the Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic (AVISO) delayed-time updated mapped data. Because the SSH anomaly is generally less reliable near the coast, the data in regions shallower than 1000 m were eliminated. We added the SSH anomaly from the mean values during 1993–2007 to the climatological sea surface dynamic height relative to 1000 dbar based on the World Ocean Atlas 2005 (Fig. 1a) (Locarnini et al. 2006; Antonov et al. 2006) and obtained absolute SSH (HALT).

CTD SBE 911plus (Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.) casts were performed between 1998 and 2010 by the R/V Mirai of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). The periods and numbers of the hydrographic observations to a depth exceeding 1000 dbar in the region of 41 N–53 N, 150 E–170 E excepting the Sea of Okhotsk (Fig. 2) are listed in Table 1. Observations were performed every year from 1998 to 2010; at K2, hydrographic profiles were obtained in almost all cruises after 2001. In particular, cruises were performed almost twice a year in the early 2000s, when the WSAG significantly changed as described in the following sections. Thus, the AGEM method can provide the time series of the vertical hydrographic structure around the K2 station associated with the gyre variation. A total of 196 temperature and salinity profiles were used to construct AGEM fields.
Fig. 2

CTD stations in the R/V Mirai cruises from 1998 to 2010

Table 1

Cruise names, observation periods, and numbers of data points of the R/V Mirai observation data used in the present paper

Cruise name

Period

Number of points

MR98-K01

Oct 30 – Dec 15, 1998

14

MR99-K02

May 7 – May 30, 1999

6

MR00-K01

Jan 5 – Feb 6, 2000

8

MR00-K03

May 9 – Jun 9, 2000

44

MR01-K03

Jun 4 – Jul 18, 2001

26

MR01-K04 leg2

Aug 28 – Sep 14, 2001

7

MR02-K05 leg2

Oct 11 – Nov 6, 2002

9

MR03-K01

Feb 20 – Mar 30, 2003

9

MR04-02

Mar 26 – Apr 16, 2004

3

MR04-06

Oct 14 – Nov 9, 2004

5

MR05-01

Feb 28 – Mar 24, 2005

4

MR06-03 leg1

May 26 – Jun 18, 2006

29

MR07-01

Feb 16 – Mar 26, 2007

4

MR08-05

Oct 11 – Nov 7, 2008

14

MR10-01

Jan 19 – Feb 24, 2010

5

MR10-06

Oct 23 – Nov 3, 2010

9

CTD sensors were calibrated before and after the research cruises. Accuracies for the temperature and conductivity are better than the nominal accuracies of 0.001C and 0.0003 S m−1, respectively. Water was sampled by Niskin bottles mounted on a frame bearing the CTD profiler and water sampler. CTD salinity values were corrected using salinity data from the bottles. The accuracy of the corrected salinity is better than 0.001 psu. The data are publicly available on the websites of hydrographic data during JAMSTEC Cruises at stations KNOT and K2 (http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/k2/index.html) and the JAMSTEC Environmental Biogeochemical Cycle Research Program (http://ebcrpa.jamstec.go.jp/k2s1/en). Detailed information about the cruises and the CTD data is provided on the websites.

Sea surface dynamic height based on the CTD data (HCTD) for comparison with HALT was computed in meter units. In this estimation, vertical integration was performed from the sea surface to the reference pressure level of 1000 dbar. The error in HCTD from CTD temperature (0.001C) and salinity (0.001) was estimated to be at most 0.1 cm, negligibly small compared to HALT.

In Fig. 3a, we show the AGEM fields for potential temperature (𝜃) and salinity (S) interpolated by the Gaussian weight function with an e-folding scale of 0.25 cm with respect to HCTD between 0.86 and 1.18 m after the removal of the average seasonal signals. When HCTD is lower than approximately 1.1 m, the minimum and maximum of 𝜃 are present at depths of approximately 100 and 400 m, respectively. The temperature inversion is a typical thermal structure found in the western subarctic North Pacific. However, it should be noted that the variation of SSH is not sensitive to the variation of potential temperature in the study region. Accordingly, we should not focus on the variation of the minimal- 𝜃 layer depth estimated by the AGEM method.
Fig. 3

a AGEM fields of potential temperature inC (color shades) and salinity (contours) from the sea surface to a depth of 1000 dbar as a function of sea surface dynamic height relative to 1000 dbar based on CTD observations, i.e., HCTD. Color scale for potential temperature is shown in the lower-right corner of panel and contour interval for salinity is 0.1. White contour indicates salinity value of 33.8, which is used as the halocline bottom in the western subarctic region in Fig. 11. b Potential density, σ𝜃, calculated in kg m−3 from potential temperature and salinity, with a contour interval of 0.2 kg m−3. Vertical lines at the top of each panel indicate dynamic height values based on CTD data

Salinity increases with depth below the minimal- 𝜃 layer, i.e., in the halocline, where no significant seasonal variation is present, compensating for the temperature inversion to maintain the density stratification (Fig. 3b). The main pycnocline is present just below the halocline, and their boundary, i.e., the halocline bottom or the main pycnocline top, corresponds to the depth of salinity value of 33.8 (white contour in Fig. 3a), which is equivalent to that identified by Ohtani (1973). These characteristics of the AGEM fields are consistent with the climatological structures along 49 N in Fig. 6 prepared by Miura et al. (2002). Furthermore, the 33.8-isohaline depth is clearly dependent of HCTD. Thus, in this paper, the 33.8 isohaline is defined as depth of the pycnocline top, and the year-to-year variation will be discussed in Section 4.

For HCTD higher than approximately 1.1 m (HALT>1.26 m, as a result of a linear regression described below), no temperature inversion is present (Fig. 3a), suggesting strong influence by water originated in the subtropical region. The contours of salinity greater than approximately 33.8 and the contours of the potential density greater than approximately 26.8σ𝜃, i.e., the main pycnocline, deepen as the HCTD increases (Fig. 3b). As in Fig. 7, high HALT (>1.26 m) is almost always outside the WSAG. Thus, the AGEM analysis based on the CTD data makes the identification of the year-to-year variation of the halocline bottom depth in the western subarctic region possible.

In Fig. 4, we show AGEM-based salinity (solid lines) at three levels of 250, 500, and 750 dbar with respect to HCTD. CTD salinity values (dots) are found to be largely close to the AGEM-based salinity. Toward the lower end of the dynamic height range, particularly at 250 dbar level, AGEM-based salinity deviates from CTD salinity because of the end-effect of the smoothing with respect to the dynamic height and the small number of data points near the end. The results presented in this paper are derived from smoothed AGEM-derived values by low-pass filters with half-power periods longer than 1.6 years and, thus, not affected by the extreme events near the lower end of the dynamic height range. Probably affected by various factors such as precipitation and vertical mixing around the bottom of the mixed layer, the salinity discrepancies at 250 dbar level (Fig. 4a) are larger than those at the deeper levels (Fig. 4b, c). In the range of HCTD>1.05 m, the waters from the Sea of Okhotsk (e.g., Katsumata and Yasuda 2010) are identified by anomalously low CTD salinity (∼33.4 at 250 dbar and ∼33.6 at 500 dbar). By the AGEM method, occasional disturbances due to intrusion of the water from the Sea of Okhotsk are filtered out.
Fig. 4

AGEM-based salinity (solid lines) at depths of a 250 dbar, b 500 dbar, and c 750 dbar with CTD salinity values (dots)

Because, in general, AGEM fields may change in time, it is useful to examine temporal changes of difference between AGEM-based and CTD salinity values. As illustrated in Fig. 5, AGEM-based salinity at K2 (circles) is sometimes slightly smaller than CTD salinity obtained within a region of 100 km from K2 (crosses). Salinity bias appears to occur interannually such as in 2001, 2009, and 2010 and maximizes to approximately 0.2. The year-to-year occurrences of salinity bias are independent of the variations of the halocline bottom depth and geostrophic circulation associated with the change of HALT in Section 4.
Fig. 5

Temporal variations of AGEM-based (circles) and CTD (crosses) salinities at depth of 250 dbar around station K2

HCTD and HALT are linearly related with a high correlation coefficient of 0.83 (Fig. 6), a significance level much higher than 99 %. This relationship shows that the variation of HALT is also related to the variation in hydrographic structures. Assuming a linear relationship, we performed a linear regression between them as
$$ H_{\text{ALT}} = a \: H_{\text{CTD}} + b, $$
(1)
where coefficients a (1.61) and b (−0.51) were obtained by the least square method. By using the regression analysis, we can obtain the variations for hydrographic structures and geostrophic circulation. The root-mean-square difference was calculated to be 4 cm, which is of the same order of magnitude as errors in the HALT data.
Fig. 6

Scatter plot of HCTD versus HALT. Slanted solid line is the linear regression

Note that HCTD distributes narrowly in comparison with HALT, resulting in a positively discrepant slope in the linear regression, i.e., a, from unity. HALT includes the variation in the layer deeper than 1000 dbar, whereas HCTD does not. The small variation in HCTD is attributable mainly to the absence of any calculation for the variation in the deep layer. Nevertheless, the high correlation between HALT and HCTD suggests that the variation in the deep layer is in phase with the layer above it. To evaluate the variation in the WSAG in the top 1000 dbar, converting HALT to potential temperature and salinity in the top 1000 dbar via (1) can provide useful information.

3 Altimetric SSH change

Figure 7 shows the interannual variation in HALT in the western subarctic North Pacific which was smoothed to remove seasonal variations by using a Butterworth filter with a half-power period of 1.6 years. In the mid-1990s (Fig. 7a, b), almost the entire western subarctic North Pacific, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula, Kuril Islands, and Hokkaido, was occupied by lower HALT than approximately 1.1 m. As a whole, the sea surface current circulates cyclonically around the low HALT due to geostrophy.
Fig. 7

Variation of altimetric SSH (HALT) in the western subarctic North Pacific. Smoothing was performed by using a Butterworth low-pass filter with a half-power period of 1.6 years. Maps of SSH in March are shown every 2 years from (a) 1994 to (h) 2008. Contour interval is 0.05 m. Mesh indicates areas of no data. Color scale is shown to the right of panel h

The zonal extension of the low- HALT region began to shrink around the year 2000 (Fig. 7d, e). Subsequently, a local cyclonic circulation was generated east of the Kamchatka Peninsula (Fig. 7f). In the mid-to-late 2000s, the local circulation intensified and is clearly recognizable east of the peninsula from the HALT values lower than 0.9 m (Fig. 7g, h). Thus, the circulation current south of the peninsula was weakened and was associated with the northward shrinkage of the low- HALT region. The variation of HALT is considered to be generated by the change of the WSAG. Meanwhile, the outer limb of the low- HALT region (HALT>1.2 m) migrates northward only in the region off the southeastern coast of Hokkaido, as is consistent with the northward shift of the southern border of the Oyashio reported by Kuroda et al. (2015).

Analysis using EOF modes (e.g., Thomson and Emery (2014) is useful for clarifying the non-propagating property of the variation in HALT due to the attenuation of the gyre. Figure 8a shows the amplitude of the first EOF mode of the variation in HALT, smoothed by a Butterworth low-pass filter with a half-power period of 5.5 years to clarify the variation described above. The first mode accounts for 58 % of the total variance. This mode has negative amplitudes in almost the whole western subarctic North Pacific east of the Kamchatka Peninsula, Kuril Islands, and Hokkaido, except for the north of 52 N. The amplitude is particularly large in the offshore region of the northern Kuril Islands with a maximum at approximately 49 N, 165 E. To the north of 52 N, the opposite, i.e., positive, amplitude occurs around the center of 54 N, 165 E. The time coefficient of the first EOF mode (Fig. 8b) decreases remarkably in the period from the late 1990s to the mid-2000s. The first EOF mode of HALT is representative of the variation of the WSAG and the local cyclonic circulation east of the Kamchatka Peninsula (Fig. 7).
Fig. 8

a Amplitude and b time coefficient of the first EOF mode of HALT. Smoothing was performed using a Butterworth filter with a half-power period of 5.5 years. In (a), shading and mesh indicate negative values and no data, respectively, and contour interval is 0.01. Geostrophic volume transports in the top 1000-dbar layer, based on AGEM fields, were calculated at the Z- and M-lines shown in Fig. 9

4 Circulation and halocline bottom depth changes

In order to illustrate the variation of the circulation, we estimated the geostrophic volume transports of the gyre in the top 1000 dbar layer with a reference level of 1000 dbar. As suggested by the first EOF mode of HALT in Fig. 8a, the WSAG changes its extension and shape, accompanied by the changes in HALT alternatively north and south of approximately 52 N. The volume transport of the western half of the WSAG was calculated in Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) at a zonal line from the point of the negatively maximal amplitude (4853 N, 16430 E) to the coast of the Kuril Islands (Z-line) (thin dashed line in Fig. 9). In addition, the volume transport of the northern local circulation was calculated by a meridional line from the point of the negatively maximal amplitude to that of the positively maximal amplitude (5338 N, 16430 E) (M-line) (thin solid line).
Fig. 9

Weekly geostrophic volume transports at Z- (thin dashed line) and M-lines (thin solid line). Smoothed time series at Z- and M-lines by a Butterworth filter with a half-power period of 5.5 years are denoted by thick dashed and solid lines, respectively. Locations of the lines are shown in Fig. 8a. Positive values indicate southward transports at Z-line and eastward transport at M-line

High-frequency variations on annual and intra-annual timescales are present at both lines and are often inversely related to each other. To remove such high-frequency variations, smoothing was performed by using the same low-pass filter as in Fig. 8 (thick dashed and solid lines in Fig. 9). Associated with the northward shrinkage of the WSAG, the volume transports changes substantially. According to Rintoul et al. (2002) and Sokolov et al. (2004), we calculated the streamfunction of baroclinic volume transport defined as potential energy anomaly integrated from the sea surface to 1000 dbar:
$$ \chi_{1000} = \frac{1}{g} {\int}_{0}^{1000} p \delta \: \mathrm{d}p, $$
(2)
where g is the acceleration due to gravity, p is the pressure, and δ is the specific volume anomaly. By using smoothed χ1000 in the late 1990s and mid-2000s, the circulation patterns of the extended and diminished WSAG are illustrated in Fig. 10a and b, respectively. For the extended WSAG, which is similar to the extended WSAG that occurred around 1996 (Fig. 10a), the westward current at the M-line is connected to the southwestward East Kamchatka Current at the Z-line; then, the volume transport at the M- (dashed line in Fig. 9) and Z-lines (solid line) maximized at approximately 1.0 Sv in 1996.
Fig. 10

Streamfunction in a 1994 and b 2004, i.e., periods of the extended and diminished states of the WSAG. Stream function is calculated as potential energy anomaly integrated from the sea surface to 1000 dbar, i.e., χ1000 (T kg s−1) in Eq. 2, in the region of 41 N– 54 N, 149 E– 166 E excluding the Sea of Okhotsk. Contour interval is 5 T kg s−1. Color scale is shown to the right of panel b. Station K2, Z-line, and M-line are indicated by star, zonal line, and meridional line, respectively

However, for the diminished WSAG, as observed in 2004 (Fig. 10b), the eastward current at the M-line possibly originates in the southward current east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition, the current at the Z-line is directed northward and proceeds to the southern part of the eastward current at the M-line. By removing the volume transport from the Z-line, the volume transport of the local cyclonic circulation at the M-line reaches approximately 1.3 Sv around 2004, equivalent to that of the extended WSAG around 1996. Thus, the volume transport of the WSAG is suggested not to be reduced substantially, despite the gyre being shrunk to the northern local circulation east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. The maximal volume transport of the gyre is on the same order of magnitude of the Oyashio transport southeast of Hokkaido (1–4 Sv) with the reference level of 1000 dbar by Hata (1965), but tends to be smaller than the absolute Oyashio transport in the top 1000 dbar layer (0.5–12.8 Sv) (Uehara et al. 2004) because of the moderately baroclinic current structure of the gyre.

During the mid-2000s, station K2 was not located in the low- χ1000 region (χ1000 < 390 T kg s−1), where the main pycnocline is shallower than in the surrounding regions, because of the northward shrinkage of the WSAG from late 1990s to mid-2000s. In other words, the northward shrinkage of the WSAG displaced the main pycnocline at K2 downward substantially. To illustrate the displacement of the main pycnocline top (i.e., the halocline bottom), we take the depth of AGEM-based salinity value of 33.8 (white contour in Fig. 3a) as the depth of the halocline bottom and show the annual mean depth by solid line in Fig. 11. For comparison, the yearly variation of the dichothermal layer depth based on in situ CTD data collected at K2 by the R/V Mirai (Wakita et al. 2010, 2013) and within a range of 100 km from K2 by Argo floats (Advanced automatic QC Argo Data Ver. 1 provided in ftp://ftp2.jamstec.go.jp/pub/argo/AQC/) is displayed by dotted line. The relationship between the depths of the halocline bottom and the dichothermal layer inferred in Section 1 can be identified; their correlation coefficient is 0.66, which is higher than 95 % significance level (0.60) based on the Student’s ttest. The vertical displacement of the dichothermal layer at K2 is significantly linked to that of the main pycnocline caused by the variation of the WSAG.
Fig. 11

Annual mean value of the AGEM-based halocline bottom depth at station K2 (solid line) and yearly value of the in situ temperature minimum layer, i.e., dichothermal layer, depth around K2 (dotted line) estimated by the Wakita et al.’s (2010, 2013) method. The AGEM-based halocline bottom depth is indicated by the depth level of AGEM-based isohaline of 33.8

It should be noted that from 2007 to 2009, the dichothermal layer is unexpectedly shallow despite of the very deep halocline bottom. Presumably, sea surface heat, freshwater, and momentum forcing in the Being Sea and the northern part of the western subarctic region might not be sufficiently strong for the winter mixed layer to reach the potential maximal depth of the dichothermal layer set by the main pycnocline depth. Interestingly, the variations of the dichothermal layer depth and the halocline bottom depth seem to be discrepant after the La Niña event of 2007/2008. In La Niña, sea-level winds in the North Pacific subarctic region tend to be reduced by the attenuation of the Aleutian Low (e.g., Horel and Wallace 1981). Therefore, the La Niña-related weak winds might reduce the mechanical and convective mixing in the sea surface layer along paths of water column and suppress the winter mixed layer development at K2.

5 Summary and conclusion

Using hydrographic data collected by the R/V Mirai and altimetric SSH data, we examined the year-to-year changes of SSH, AGEM-based geostrophic volume transport, and streamfunction in the top 1000 dbar in the western subarctic North Pacific, and the halocline bottom depth (equivalently, the main pycnocline depth) at station K2. The low SSH region was found to have shrunk northward from the late 1990s to the mid-2000s, being associated with the locally and anomalously low SSH region to the east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. Associated with the SSH variation, the WSAG was greatly reduced in its extension, but not in intensity (volume transport). Meanwhile, the southern border of the basin-scale subarctic circulation surrounding the WSAG, i.e., the Oyashio, migrates northward only in the region off the southeastern coast of Hokkaido, as reported by Kuroda et al. (2015).

The K2 station was found to stay in the region of large SSH variability associated with the substantial northward shrinkage of the WSAG. The downward displacement of the halocline bottom at K2 with the northward shrinkage of the WSAG was found to be significantly related to the downward displacement of the temperature minimum layer, i.e., dichothermal layer, around K2 based on the in situ shipboard CTD and Argo data processed by the method that Wakita et al. (2010, 2013) adopted. Thus, it is concluded that the dichothermal layer depth at K2 is significantly linked to the vertical displacement of the main pycnocline associated with the variation of the gyre if the vertical mixing by the sea surface heat, freshwater, and momentum forcing are sufficiently strong.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the members of the board, the R/V Mirai (cruise number: MR98-K01, MR99-K02, MR00-K01, MR00-K03, MR01-K03, MR01-K04 leg2, MR02-K05 leg2, MR03-K01, MR04-02, MR04-06, MR05-01, MR06-03 leg1, MR07-01, MR08-05, MR10-01, and MR10-06) for collecting the CTD data. The authors also thank the JAMSTEC Argo team for providing Advanced automatic QC Argo Data, and Ssalto/Duacs and AVISO for providing the altimetric SSH data with support from Cnes. The thanks are extended to Prof. Y. Michida (Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo), Dr. R. J. Greatbatch (Associate Editor of Ocean Dynamics), and anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments. This work was partly supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (22106007, 25106709, 15H02835).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Nagano
    • 1
  • Masahide Wakita
    • 2
  • Shuichi Watanabe
    • 2
  1. 1.Research and Development Center for Global ChangeJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and TechnologyKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Mutsu Institute for OceanographyJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and TechnologyAomoriJapan

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