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Multiple habitat use of Japanese sea bass Lateolabrax japonicus in the estuary region of the Tone River system, implied by stable isotope analysis

  • Yoichi Miyake
  • Hikaru Itakura
  • Aigo Takeshige
  • Hiroaki Onda
  • Akira Yamaguchi
  • Akihito Yoneta
  • Kohma Arai
  • Yulina V. Hane
  • Shingo Kimura
Short Report

Abstract

Japanese sea bass Lateolabrax japonicus is a euryhaline fish species. The present study aimed to elucidate their habitat use in the estuary region of the Tone River system in Japan through stable isotope analysis. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of muscle tissues of 74 specimens were grouped by hierarchical cluster analysis and were compared with body sizes. The results suggested that Japanese sea bass has multiple groups of habitat use (brackish and saltwater) within the estuary region and can distribute in the brackish part of the river during winter.

Keywords

Stable isotope Estuary Habitat Migration Sea bass 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Dr. T. Miyajima for his advice on the stable isotope analyses, Mr. Y. Tada for providing fish specimens, and to Mr. M. Yanagihori and CHOJIN members for sharing useful information. We are also grateful to Mrs. D. Miyake for improving our manuscript.

Supplementary material

10228_2018_655_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (320 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PPTX 319 kb)
10228_2018_655_MOESM2_ESM.pptx (102 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PPTX 102 kb)
10228_2018_655_MOESM3_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 16 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Ichthyological Society of Japan 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Frontier SciencesThe University of TokyoKashiwaJapan
  2. 2.Atmosphere and Ocean Research InstituteThe University of TokyoKashiwaJapan
  3. 3.Graduate School of ScienceKobe UniversityKobeJapan
  4. 4.National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries, Japan Fisheries Research and Education AgencyYokohamaJapan
  5. 5.Saga Prefectural Ariake Fisheries Research and Development CenterOgiJapan

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