Ichthyological Research

, Volume 64, Issue 1, pp 18–28 | Cite as

Validity of Encrasicholina pseudoheteroloba (Hardenberg 1933) and redescription of Encrasicholina heteroloba (Rüppell 1837), a senior synonym of Encrasicholina devisi (Whitley 1940) (Clupeiformes: Engraulidae)

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Abstract

Examination of the holotypes of two nominal species, Encrasicholina heteroloba (Rüppell 1837) and E. devisi (Whitley 1940), both previously recognized as valid species, was revealed to represent a single species. Accordingly, E. heteroloba is regarded as a senior synonym of E. devisi. Encrasicholina pseudoheteroloba (Hardenberg 1933), previously regarded as a junior synonym of E. heteroloba, is in fact a valid species in its own right and is therefore elevated accordingly. Encrasicholina heteroloba is distinguished from its congeners by a long upper jaw (posterior tip extending beyond the posterior margin of the preopercle), three unbranched rays in the dorsal and anal fins, and a shorter relative head length (24.9–28.9 % of standard length). Encrasicholina pseudoheteroloba differs from its congeners in having a long upper jaw (posterior tip extending beyond the posterior margin of the preopercle) and two unbranched rays in the dorsal and anal fins. A neotype is designated for E. pseudoheteroloba.

Keywords

Anchovy Morphology Taxonomy Synonymy Neotype 

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Copyright information

© The Ichthyological Society of Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The United Graduate School of Agricultural SciencesKagoshima UniversityKagoshimaJapan
  2. 2.The Kagoshima University MuseumKagoshimaJapan

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