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Transferring motivation from educational to extramural contexts: a review of the trans-contextual model

Abstract

Students’ self-determined or autonomous motivation in educational contexts is associated with adaptive educational and behavioural outcomes including persistence on educational tasks and academic performance. A key question for educators is whether promoting autonomous motivation toward activities in an educational context leads to increased autonomous motivation toward related activities in extramural contexts. In this article, we present a trans-contextual model that demonstrates the processes by which autonomous motivation is transferred from educational to extramural contexts. Using an integrated, multi-theory approach including self-determination and planned behaviour theories, we propose a motivational sequence in which perceived support for autonomous motivation for a given activity leads to autonomous motivation in educational contexts but also to autonomous motivation toward activities in extramural contexts. Autonomous motivation toward the activity in extramural contexts is proposed to be associated with attitudes, perceived control, and intentions to perform the activity in future and actual behaviour. We review recent prospective and intervention research that has applied the model to explain the transfer of autonomous motivation toward physical activity from a physical education context to a leisure time context. We also outline how the model can be applied in other educational contexts such as the transfer of motivation for science and language activities in educational contexts to motivation toward assignments in these subjects in extramural contexts. The applicability of the model as a basis for educational interventions to promote motivational transfer across contexts is discussed.

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Author information

Correspondence to Martin S. Hagger.

Additional information

Martin S. Hagger. School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. Email: martin.hagger@curtin.edu.au

Current themes of research:

Self-regulation. Health behaviour. Motivation. Self-determination. Self-control. Behaviour change. Theoretical integration.

Relevant publications:

Barkoukis, V., Hagger, M.S., Lambropoulos, G., & Torbatzoudis, H. (2010). Extending the trans-contextual model in physical education and leisure-time contexts: examining the role of basic psychological need satisfaction. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80, 647–670. doi:10.1348/000709910X487023.

Hagger, M.S., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., Hein, V., Pihu, M., Soós, I., Karsai, I., Lintunen, T., & Leemans, S. (2009). Teacher, peer, and parent autonomy support in physical education and leisure-time physical activity: a trans-contextual model of motivation in four cultures. Psychology and Health, 24(6), 689–711. doi:10.1080/08870440801956192.

Hagger, M.S., Biddle, S.J.H., & Wang, C.K.J. (2005). Physical self-perceptions in adolescence: generalizability of a multidimensional, hierarchical model across gender and grade. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 65, 297–322.

Hagger, M.S., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., Barkoukis, V., Wang, C.K.J., & Baranowski, J. (2005). Perceived autonomy support in physical education and leisure-time physical activity: a cross-cultural evaluation of the trans-contextual model. Journal of Educational Psychology, 97, 376–390. doi:10.1037/0022-0663.97.3.376.

Hagger, M.S., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., Culverhouse, T., & Biddle, S.J.H. (2003). The processes by which perceived autonomy support in physical education promotes leisure-time physical activity intentions and behavior: a trans-contextual model. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 784–795. doi:10.1037/0022-0663.95.4.784.

Nikos L. D. Chatzisarantis. Motivation in Education Research Laboratory, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616, Singapore. E-mail: nikos.chatzisarantis@nie.edu.sg

Current themes of research:

Motivation. Intrinsic motivation. Physical education. Behavioural economics. Autonomy support. Psychological needs. Prospect theory.

Relevant publications:

Wang, C.K.J., Liu, W.C., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., & Lim, B.S.C. (2010). Influence of perceived motivational climate on achievement goals in physical education: A structural equation mixture modeling analysis. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 32, 324–338.

Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., & Hagger, M.S. (2009). Effects of an intervention based on self-determination theory on self-reported leisure-time physical activity participation. Psychology and Health, 24(1), 29–48. doi:10.1080/08870440701809533.

Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., & Hagger, M.S. (2005). Effects of a brief intervention based on the theory of planned behavior on leisure time physical activity participation. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 470–487.

Hagger, M.S., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D., Barkoukis, V., Wang, C.K.J., & Baranowski, J. (2005). Perceived autonomy support in physical education and leisure-time physical activity: a cross-cultural evaluation of the trans-contextual model. Journal of Educational Psychology, 97, 376–390. doi:10.1037/0022-0663.97.3.376.

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Hagger, M.S., Chatzisarantis, N.L.D. Transferring motivation from educational to extramural contexts: a review of the trans-contextual model. Eur J Psychol Educ 27, 195–212 (2012) doi:10.1007/s10212-011-0082-5

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Keywords

  • Motivational transfer
  • Self-determination theory
  • Intrinsic motivation
  • Theoretical integration
  • Theory of planned behaviour
  • Hierarchical model