Universal Access in the Information Society

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 115–128

Augmentative and alternative communication devices for aphasia: the emerging role of “smart” mobile devices

  • Karyn Moffatt
  • Golnoosh Pourshahid
  • Ronald M. Baecker
Long paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10209-015-0428-x

Cite this article as:
Moffatt, K., Pourshahid, G. & Baecker, R.M. Univ Access Inf Soc (2017) 16: 115. doi:10.1007/s10209-015-0428-x

Abstract

Recent advances in mobile technology offer new directions for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC); however, it remains unclear whether they meet the needs of individuals with aphasia. This paper reports on research seeking to understand this changing landscape. A Web-based survey of aphasia-oriented clinicians helped illuminate device adoption trends. Observations of group therapy sessions featuring high-tech AAC use and focus groups with the clinicians from those sessions provided further nuance and insight into usage and adoption. It was shown that “smart” mobile devices are garnering acceptance as a promising platform for high-tech AAC; however, contrary to the authors’ expectations, these devices are not being paired with mobile versions of traditional picture dictionaries. Rather, clinicians reported appropriating generic applications to complement other (non-high-tech) communication strategies, suggesting new opportunities for design.

Keywords

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) Aphasia Mobile technology Communication support 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karyn Moffatt
    • 1
  • Golnoosh Pourshahid
    • 2
  • Ronald M. Baecker
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Information StudiesMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Technologies for Aging Gracefully LabUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

Personalised recommendations