Universal Access in the Information Society

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 329–339 | Cite as

Cognitive and learning difficulties and how they affect access to IT systems

  • Simeon Keates
  • Ray Adams
  • Cathy Bodine
  • Sara Czaja
  • Wayne Gordon
  • Peter Gregor
  • Emily Hacker
  • Vicki Hanson
  • John Kemp
  • Mark Laff
  • Clayton Lewis
  • Michael Pieper
  • John Richards
  • David Rose
  • Anthony Savidis
  • Greg Schultz
  • Paul Snayd
  • Shari Trewin
  • Philip Varker
Long Paper

Abstract

In October 2005, the IBM Human Ability and Accessibility Center and T.J. Watson Research Center hosted a symposium on “cognitive and learning difficulties and how they affect access to IT systems”. The central premise of the symposium was the recognition that cognitive and learning difficulties have a profound impact on a person’s ability to interact with information technology (IT) systems, but that little support is currently being offered by those systems. By bringing together internationally renowned experts from a variety of different, but complementary, research fields, the symposium aimed to provide a complete overview of the issues related to this topic. This paper summarises the discussions and findings of the symposium.

Keywords

Cognitive impairment Learning difficulties Design Cognitive models 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simeon Keates
    • 1
  • Ray Adams
    • 3
  • Cathy Bodine
    • 4
  • Sara Czaja
    • 5
  • Wayne Gordon
    • 6
  • Peter Gregor
    • 7
  • Emily Hacker
    • 8
  • Vicki Hanson
    • 2
  • John Kemp
    • 9
  • Mark Laff
    • 2
  • Clayton Lewis
    • 10
  • Michael Pieper
    • 11
  • John Richards
    • 2
  • David Rose
    • 12
  • Anthony Savidis
    • 13
  • Greg Schultz
    • 14
  • Paul Snayd
    • 14
  • Shari Trewin
    • 2
  • Philip Varker
    • 14
  1. 1.ITA SoftwareCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.IBM T.J. Watson Research CenterHawthorneUSA
  3. 3.Collaborative International Research Centre for Universal Access (CIRCUA), School of Computing ScienceMiddlesex UniversityHendonUK
  4. 4.Assistive Technology Partners, Department of Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  6. 6.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineMt Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy PlaceNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Applied ComputingUniversity of DundeeDundeeScotland
  8. 8.Division of Employment, Training, Education & Youth ServicesF.E.G.S.New YorkUSA
  9. 9.Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, P.C.WashingtonUSA
  10. 10.Coleman Institute for Cognitive DisabilitiesUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  11. 11.Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology FITSankt AugustinGermany
  12. 12.CASTWakefielUSA
  13. 13.Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH)Institute of Computer ScienceHeraklionGreece
  14. 14.IBM Human Ability and Accessibility CenterHawthorneUSA

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