Design for participation: providing access to e-information for older adults

Long paper

Abstract

Electronic information sources are becoming increasingly more prolific and offer a huge potential for those able to use them. However, for those unable to access those services, there is the risk of being further disadvantaged by continued exclusion from an increasing number of services. This paper presents two examples of kiosks designed to help principally older adults access online governmental information sources. The design issues identified and the implications for future kiosk interface designs, both for hardware and software, are also discussed.

Keywords

Digital divide Inclusive design Information access Kiosks Participation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simeon Keates
    • 1
  • P. John Clarkson
    • 2
  • Peter Robinson
    • 3
  1. 1.IBM T.J. Research CenterHawthorneUSA
  2. 2.Department of EngineeringUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  3. 3.Computer LaboratoryUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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