Limnology

, 10:167 | Cite as

Invertebrate assemblages in relation to habitat types on a floating mat in Mizorogaike Pond, Kyoto, Japan

Research paper

Abstract

Abiotic environmental variables and invertebrate assemblages were compared among four habitat types (bare hollow, sphagnum-rich hollow, pool, and mat edge) on a floating mat in Mizorogaike Pond, Kyoto. We found differences in abiotic environments between two hollows and two inundated habitats (pool and mat edge); pH was significantly lower in hollow habitats than in inundated habitats, and water depths were significantly shallower in sphagnum-rich hollows than in inundated sites. The composition of invertebrate assemblages in the hollow was distinct from that in the inundated habitats. The abundances of some dominant invertebrate taxa or functional feeding groups on the floating mat differed between the hollows and inundated habitats, and were correlated with water temperature, pH and depth. These results indicate that habitat heterogeneity created by the coexistence of hollows and inundated habitats contributes to species diversity on the floating mat in Mizorogaike Pond. A comparison of the pH values in different wetlands revealed that both bog- and fen-specific components coexist within this system. In order to adequately manage and conserve peatland ecosystems, it is necessary to consider the importance and vulnerability of both hollows and inundated habitats in peatlands.

Keywords

Assemblage composition Freshwater invertebrates Habitat heterogeneity Temperate bog 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Y. Murakami and T. Shimamura for their assistance with field investigations. T. Sota and K. Watanabe provided helpful advice during the course of the study, as well as many useful comments on the manuscript. For their assistance with the identification of organisms, we also thank I. Murakami (overall macroinvertebrates), A. Ohtaka (Oligochaeta), and M. Yamamoto (Chironomidae). We thank two anonymous referees for their critical comments on the manuscript. This work was supported in part by a grant for the 21st Century and Global COE to Kyoto University (A14 and A06).

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Limnology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Animal Ecology, Department of Zoology, Graduate School of ScienceKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Water Resources Research Center, Disaster Prevention Research InstituteKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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