Limnology

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 243–250 | Cite as

Abundance and composition of the summer phytoplankton community along a transect from the Barguzin River to the central basin of Lake Baikal

  • Toshiya Katano
  • Shin-ichi Nakano
  • Hiroyuki Ueno
  • Osamu Mitamura
  • Kaori Anbutsu
  • Masayuki Kihira
  • Yasuhiro Satoh
  • Takeshi Satoh
  • Valentin V. Drucker
  • Yuji Tanaka
  • Yuki Akagashi
  • Masahito Sugiyama
Asia/Oceania report

Abstract

The abundance and composition of phytoplankton were investigated at six stations along a transect from the Barguzin River inflow to the central basin of Lake Baikal in August 2002 to clarify the effect of the river inflow on the phytoplankton community in the lake. The water temperature in the epilimnion was high near the shore at Station 1 (17.3°C), probably due to the higher temperature of the river water, and gradually decreased offshore at Station 6 (14.5°C). Thermal stratification developed at Stations 2–6, and a thermocline was observed at a 17–22-m depth at Stations 2–4 and an 8–12-m depth at Stations 5 and 6. The concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients in the epilimnion at all stations were <1.0 μmol N l−1 and <0.16 μmol P l−1, respectively. Relatively high concentrations of nutrients (0.56–7.38 μmol N l−1 and 0.03–0.28 μmol P l−1) were detected in the deeper parts of the euphotic zone. Silicate was not exhausted at all stations (>20 μmol Si l−1). The chlorophyll a (chl. a) concentration was high (>10 μg l−1) near the shore at Station 1 and low (<3 μg l−1) at five other stations. The <2 μm fraction of chl. a in Stations 2–6 ranged between 0.80 and 1.85 μg l−1, and its contribution to total chl. a was high (>60%). In this fraction, picocyanobacteria were abundant at all stations and ranged between 5 × 104 and 5 × 105 cells ml−1. In contrast, chl. a in the >2 μm fraction varied significantly (0.14–11.17 μg l−1), and the highest value was observed at Station 1. In this fraction, the dominant phytoplankton was Aulacoseira and centric diatoms at Station 1 and Cryptomonas, Ankistrodesmus, Asterionella, and Nitzschia at Stations 2–6. The present study demonstrated the dominance of picophytoplankton in the pelagic zone, while higher abundance of phytoplankton dominated by diatoms was observed in the shallower littoral zone. These larger phytoplankters in the littoral zone probably depend on nutrients from the Barguzin River.

Keywords

Lake Baikal Phytoplankton Summer Transect 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Limnology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiya Katano
    • 1
    • 8
  • Shin-ichi Nakano
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Ueno
    • 2
  • Osamu Mitamura
    • 3
  • Kaori Anbutsu
    • 3
  • Masayuki Kihira
    • 3
  • Yasuhiro Satoh
    • 4
  • Takeshi Satoh
    • 4
  • Valentin V. Drucker
    • 5
  • Yuji Tanaka
    • 6
  • Yuki Akagashi
    • 7
  • Masahito Sugiyama
    • 7
  1. 1.Center for Marine Environmental StudiesEhime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureEhime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan
  3. 3.School of Environmental ScienceUniversity of Shiga PrefectureHikoneJapan
  4. 4.Faculty of ScienceYamagata UniversityYamagataJapan
  5. 5.Limnological Institute, Siberian Branch of the Academy of SciencesIrkutskRussia
  6. 6.Tokyo University of Marine Science and TechnologyTokyoJapan
  7. 7.Graduate School of Global Environmental StudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  8. 8.Ariake Sea Research ProjectSaga UniversitySagaJapan

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