Limnology

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 35–45 | Cite as

Seasonal changes in the microbial population of the water column and sediments of the Ongagawa River, northern Kyushu, Japan

  • Syouhei Nishihama
  • Akira Haraguchi
  • Tomonori Kawano
  • Keisuke Michiki
  • Kohji Nakazawa
  • Takuya Suzuki
  • Kazuya Uezu
  • Kazuharu Yoshizuka
Research paper

Abstract

The total viable count, population density of Escherichia coli and coliform bacteria, and nitrogen in the microbiomass (microbiomass-N) in sediments were monitored monthly at 12 points in the Ongagawa River basin from June 2002 to May 2006. The measurement of the sediment microbiomass-N was used for evaluation of the sediment’s microbial population in the river ecosystem. An extraordinarily high population of E. coli was observed during the season when there was stagnant water in the basin, with a high population and an insufficient drain diffusion system, and, thus hydrological water control is indispensable to prevent rapid E. coli growth. Microbiomass-N in sediments showed a negative correlation or independent fluctuation in relation to the bacterial population in the water column of the river. Seasonal changes in extracted nitrogen (N) in river sediments did not show correspondence with microbiomass-N in sediments. The microbiomass-N in sediments changed independently of the bacterial population in the river water, indicating that the high population of bacteria in the water does not lead to a high microbial population in river sediments. Ordination of the microbial parameters by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that microbiomass-N in sediments was quite different from other parameters. Relatively higher H+ (lower pH), PO43− concentration and dissolved oxygen (DO) were the determinant parameters of higher microbiomass-N in sediments. A relative microbial abundance between the water column and sediments as well as each of the microbial populations in the water column and sediments could be a quantitative parameter for evaluating the biochemical processes of stream water.

Keywords

Biochemical environment Escherichia coli Microbial population Microbiomass-N in sediments Ongagawa River basin 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Limnology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Syouhei Nishihama
    • 1
  • Akira Haraguchi
    • 1
  • Tomonori Kawano
    • 2
  • Keisuke Michiki
    • 3
  • Kohji Nakazawa
    • 1
  • Takuya Suzuki
    • 1
  • Kazuya Uezu
    • 1
  • Kazuharu Yoshizuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Environmental EngineeringThe University of KitakyushuKitakyushuJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Environmental EngineeringThe University of KitakyushuKitakyushuJapan
  3. 3.Instrumentation CenterThe University of KitakyushuKitakyushuJapan

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