Advertisement

Thermal decomposition of guaiacol in sub- and supercritical water and its kinetic analysis

  • Wahyudiono
  • Mitsuru Sasaki
  • Motonobu Goto
Original Article

Abstract

The conversion of biomass waste into resources as a recycling process is receiving increased interest due to the perceived need for a sustainable global carbon cycle and environmental considerations. Several treatment processes are being developed. Hydrothermal treatment is one of the most effective approaches, because water at high temperatures and high pressures behaves as a reaction medium with remarkable properties. In this work, the reaction behavior of guaiacol as a biomass model compound was studied in subcritical water at 483–563 K and in supercritical water at 653–673 K using a batch reactor. Guaiacol can be considered representative of the aromatic ring structures present in lignin, a major component of woody biomass. The chemical species formed in aqueous products were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The effect of pressure and reaction time on the conversion process of guaiacol is discussed. The results obtained indicate that this method has potential for efficient organic waste conversion.

Key words

Decomposition Biomass Lignin Guaiacol Sub- and supercritical water 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Yu Q, Brage C, Chen G, Sjostrom K (1997) Temperature impact on the formation of tar from biomass pyrolysis in free-fall reactor. J Anal Appl Pyrolysis 40–41:481–489Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Goto M, Nada T, Kawajiri S, Kodama A, Hirose T (1997) Decomposition of municipal sludge by supercritical water oxidation. J Chem Eng Jpn 30:813–818CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Goto M, Nada T, Ogata A, Kodama A, Hirose T (1998) Supercritical water oxidation for the destruction of municipal excess sludge and alcohol distillery wastewater of molasses. J Supercrit Fluids 13:277–282CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sasaki M, Kabyemela B, Malaluan R, Hirose S, Takeda N, Adschiri T, Arai K (1998) Cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water. J Supercrit Fluids 13:261–268CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sasaki M, Fang Z, Fukushima Y, Adschiri T, Arai K (2000) Dissolution and hydrolysis of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water. Ind Eng Chem Res 39:2883–2890CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Wahyudiono, Sasaki M, Goto M (2007) Non-catalytic liquefaction of tar with low-temperature hydrothermal treatment. J Mat Cycles Waste Manag 9:173–181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wahyudiono, Fujinaga S, Sasaki M, Goto M (2006) Recovery of phenol through the decomposition of tar under hydrothermal alkaline conditions. Chem Eng Technol 29:882–889CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Wahyudiono, Sasaki M, Goto M (2008) Recovery of phenolic compounds through the decomposition of lignin in near and supercritical water. Chem Eng Process 47:1609–1619Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Wahyudiono, Kanetake T, Sasaki M, Goto M (2007) Decomposition of a lignin model compound under hydrothermal conditions. Chem Eng Technol 30:113–1122CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wahyudiono, Sasaki M, Goto M (2008) Kinetic study for liquefaction of tar in sub- and supercritical water. Polym Degrad Stab 93:1194–1204CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Osada M, Sato T, Watanabe M, Shirai M, Arai K (2006) Catalytic gasification of wood biomass in subcritical and supercritical water. Combust Sci Tech 178:537–552CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Yesodharan S (2002) Supercritical water oxidation: an environmentally safe method for the disposal of organic wastes. Current Sci 82:1112–1122Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Miguelez JRP, Bernal JL, Sanz EN, de la Ossa EM (1997) Kinetics of wet air oxidation of phenol. Chem Eng J 67:115–121CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Antal MJ Jr, Allen SG, Schulman D, Xu X (2000) Biomass gasification in supercritical water. Ind Eng Chem Res 39:4040–4053CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Saisu M, Sato T, Watanabe M, Adschiri T, Arai K (2003) Conversion of lignin with supercritical water-phenol mixtures. Energy Fuels 17:922–928CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Sato T, Sekiguchi G, Adschiri T, Arai K (2002) Ortho-selective alkylation of phenol with 2-propanol without catalyst in supercritical water. Ind Eng Chem Res 41:3064–3070CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Sato T, Sekiguchi G, Saisu M, Watanabe M, Adschiri T, Arai K (2002) Dealkylation and rearrangement kinetics of 2-isopropylphenol in supercritical water. Ind Eng Chem Res 41:3124–3130CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Sato T, Adschiri T, Arai K (2003) Decomposition kinetics of 2- propylphenol in supercritical water. J Anal App Pyrolysis 70:735–746CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Kruse A, Meier D, Rimbrecht P, Schacht M (2000) Gasification of pyrocatechol in supercritical water in the presence of potassium hydroxide. Ind Eng Chem Res 39:4842–4848CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Yoshida Y, Oshima Y, Matsumura Y (2004) Gasification of biomass model compounds and real biomass in supercritical water. Biomass Bioenergy 26:71–78CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Smith JM, Van Ness HC, Abbott MM (1996) Introduction to chemical engineering thermodynamics, 5th edn. McGraw-Hill, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Wetzel SJ, Guttman CM, Girard JE (2004) The influence of matrix and laser energy on the molecular mass distribution of synthetic polymers obtained by MALDI-TOF-MS. Int J Mass Spec 238:215–225CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Jegers HE, Klein MT (1985) Primary and secondary lignin pyrolysis reaction pathways. Ind Eng Chem Proc Des Dev 24:173–183CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Lawson JR, Klein MT (1985) Influence of water on guaiacol pyrolysis. Ind Eng Chem Fundam 24:203–208CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Huppert GL, Wu BC, Townsend SH, Klein MT, Paspek SC (1989) Hydrolysis in supercritical water: identification and implications of a polar transition state. Ind Eng Chem Res 28:161–165CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Sharma RK, Wooten JB, Baliga VL, Li X, Chan WG, Hajaligol MR (2004) Characterization of chars from pyrolysis of lignin. Fuel 83:1469–1482CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Levenspiel O (1972) Chemical reaction engineering, 2nd edn. Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Martinez MT, Benito AM, Callejas MA (1997) Kinetics of asphaltene hydroconversion: 1. Thermal hydrocracking of a coal residue. Fuel 76:899–905CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Lazic ZR (2004) Design of experiments in chemical engineering. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 13:80–83Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Science and TechnologyKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Bioelectrics Research CenterKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan

Personalised recommendations