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Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 144–152 | Cite as

Occurrence of phenols in leachates from municipal solid waste landfill sites in Japan

  • Yasundo Kurata
  • Yusaku Ono
  • Yoshiro Ono
Original Article

Abstract

The concentrations of 41 phenols in leachates from 38 municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill sites in Japan were measured. The main phenols detected in leachates were phenol, three cresols, 4-tert-butylphenol, 4-tertoctylphenol, 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and some chlorophenols. The concentration levels of phenols were affected by the pH values of the leachates and the different types of landfill waste. The origins of phenol and p-cresol were considered to be incineration residues, and the major origin of 4-tert-butylphenol, bisphenol A, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol was considered to be solidified fly ash. In contrast, the major origins of 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol were considered to be incombustibles. The discharge of leachates to the environment around MSW landfill sites without water treatment facilities can cause environmental pollution by phenols. In particular, the disposal of incineration residues including solidified fly ash and the codisposal of solidified fly ash and incombustibles might raise the possibility of environmental pollution. Moreover, the discharge of leachates at pH values of 9.8 or more could pollute the water environment with phenol. However, phenol, 4-nonylphenol, and bisphenol A can be removed to below the con centration levels that impact the environment around landfill sites by a series of conventional water treatment processes.

Key words

Phenols Leachate Landfill site Municipal solid waste Landfilled waste 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Environmental Science in SaitamaSaitamaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Environmental Science and TechnologyUniversity of OkayamaOkayamaJapan

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