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Clinical and Experimental Nephrology

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 815–824 | Cite as

The clinical relevance of plasma CD147/basigin in biopsy-proven kidney diseases

  • Yoshiko Mori
  • Tomohiro Masuda
  • Tomoki Kosugi
  • Tomoki Yoshioka
  • Mayuko Hori
  • Hiroshi Nagaya
  • Kayaho Maeda
  • Yuka Sato
  • Hiroshi Kojima
  • Noritoshi Kato
  • Takuji Ishimoto
  • Takayuki Katsuno
  • Yukio Yuzawa
  • Kenji Kadomatsu
  • Shoichi Maruyama
Original article
  • 185 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Precise understanding of kidney disease activity is needed to design therapeutic strategies. CD147/basigin is involved in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury and renal fibrosis through inflammatory cell infiltration. The present study examined the clinical relevance of CD147 in biopsy-proven kidney diseases that lead to the progression of chronic kidney disease.

Methods

Kidney biopsy specimens and plasma and urine samples were obtained from patients with kidney diseases, including IgA nephropathy (IgAN), Henoch–Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN), diabetic kidney disease (DKD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and membranous nephropathy (MN), who underwent renal biopsy between 2011 and 2014. Plasma and urinary CD147 levels were measured and evaluated for their ability to reflect histological features. Disease activity of IgAN tissues was evaluated according to the Oxford classification and the Japanese histological grading system.

Results

In biopsy tissues, CD147 induction was detected in injured lesions representing renal inflammation. Plasma CD147 values correlated with eGFR in patients with inflammation-related kidney diseases such as IgAN, HSPN, and DKD. Particularly in IgAN patients, plasma CD147 levels were correlated with injured regions comprising more than 50% of glomeruli or with tubular atrophy/interstitial injury in biopsy tissues. Proteinuria showed a closer correlation with urinary values of CD147 and L-FABP. Of note, plasma and urinary CD147 levels showed a strong correlation with eGFR or proteinuria, respectively, only in DKD patients.

Conclusion

Evaluation of plasma and urinary CD147 levels might provide key insights for the understanding of the activity of various kidney diseases.

Keywords

CD147 Inflammation Proteinuria 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Norihiko Suzuki, Naoko Asano, and Yuriko Sawa for their excellent technical assistance, and Hitomi Aoyama for secretarial assistance.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interests.

Ethical standards

This study was conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki, the Japanese National Ethical Guidelines, and the institutional review boards of Nagoya University Hospital and affiliated hospitals (Approval Number, 1135).

Informed consent

All patients provided written, informed consent to participate in the study.

Grants

Supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Nephrology Research from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan (90584681 to T. K.).

Supplementary material

10157_2017_1518_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (104 kb)
Plasma and urinary values of CD147 in the patients with the kidney diseases. Box and whisker plots of A: Plasma CD147 levels (pg/mL) and B: Urinary CD147 values (μg/gCr) in the indicated patients and controls. Data are expressed as means ± standard deviations (SD). *, p < 0.05; **, p < 0.01 versus controls (PPTX 103 KB)

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Nephrology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiko Mori
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomohiro Masuda
    • 1
  • Tomoki Kosugi
    • 1
  • Tomoki Yoshioka
    • 1
  • Mayuko Hori
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Nagaya
    • 1
  • Kayaho Maeda
    • 1
  • Yuka Sato
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kojima
    • 1
  • Noritoshi Kato
    • 1
  • Takuji Ishimoto
    • 1
  • Takayuki Katsuno
    • 1
  • Yukio Yuzawa
    • 3
  • Kenji Kadomatsu
    • 2
  • Shoichi Maruyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NephrologyNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of NephrologyFujita Health University School of MedicineToyoakeJapan

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