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Clinical and Experimental Nephrology

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 746–754 | Cite as

CD147/basigin reflects renal dysfunction in patients with acute kidney injury

  • Hiroshi Nagaya
  • Tomoki KosugiEmail author
  • Mayuko Maeda-Hori
  • Kayaho Maeda
  • Yuka Sato
  • Hiroshi Kojima
  • Hiroki Hayashi
  • Noritoshi Kato
  • Takuji Ishimoto
  • Waichi Sato
  • Yukio Yuzawa
  • Seiichi Matsuo
  • Kenji Kadomatsu
  • Shoichi Maruyama
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) describes a form of intrinsic acute kidney injury (AKI) that results from persistent hypoperfusion and subsequent activation of the immune system. A glycosylated transmembrane protein, CD147/basigin, is involved in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia and fibrosis. The present study investigated whether CD147 can reflect pathological features and renal dysfunction in patients with AKI.

Methods

Plasma and spot urine samples were collected from 24 patients (12 controls and 12 with ATN) who underwent renal biopsy between 2008 and 2012. In another study, patients undergoing open surgery to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were enrolled in 2004. We collected urine and plasma samples from seven patients with AKI and 33 patients without AKI, respectively. In these experiments, plasma and urinary CD147, and urinary l-fatty acid-binding protein (l-FABP) levels were measured, and the former expression in kidneys was examined by immunostaining.

Results

In biopsy tissues of ATN with severe histological features, CD147 induction was strikingly present in inflammatory cells such as macrophages and lymphocytes in the injured interstitium, but not in damaged tubules representing atrophy. Both plasma and urinary CD147 levels were strikingly increased in ATN patients; both values showed greater correlations with renal dysfunction compared to urinary l-FABP. In patients who had undergone open AAA surgery, urinary and plasma CD147 values in AKI patients were significantly higher than in non-AKI patients at post-operative day 1, similar to the profile of urinary l-FABP.

Conclusion

CD147 was prominent in its ability to detect AKI and may allow the start of preemptive medication.

Keywords

CD147 Acute tubular necrosis Acute kidney injury l-FABP 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank Norihiko Suzuki, Naoko Asano and Yuriko Sawa for their excellent technical assistance, and Prof. Kimitoshi Nishiwaki (Nagoya University) for valuable support of this research. This study was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Progressive Renal Diseases Research, Research on Rare and Intractable Disease, Nephrology Research from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan (90584681 to T.K.).

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Nephrology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroshi Nagaya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomoki Kosugi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mayuko Maeda-Hori
    • 1
  • Kayaho Maeda
    • 1
  • Yuka Sato
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kojima
    • 1
  • Hiroki Hayashi
    • 3
  • Noritoshi Kato
    • 1
  • Takuji Ishimoto
    • 1
  • Waichi Sato
    • 1
  • Yukio Yuzawa
    • 3
  • Seiichi Matsuo
    • 1
  • Kenji Kadomatsu
    • 2
  • Shoichi Maruyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NephrologyNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of NephrologyFujita Health UniversityToyoakeJapan

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