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Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 292–297 | Cite as

Emergence of the community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 clone in a Japanese child, demonstrating multiple divergent strains in Japan

  • Wataru Higuchi
  • Shigenao Mimura
  • Yoshihiro Kurosawa
  • Tomomi Takano
  • Yasuhisa Iwao
  • Shizuka Yabe
  • Olga Razvina
  • Akihito Nishiyama
  • Yurika Ikeda-Dantsuji
  • Fuminori Sakai
  • Hideaki Hanaki
  • Tatsuo YamamotoEmail author
Note

Abstract

In 2008 we isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from an 11-month-old Japanese girl who lived in Saitama, Japan, and suffered from cellulitis of the lower thigh and sepsis. The MRSA (strain NN47) belonged to multilocus sequence type (ST) 8 and exhibited spa363 (t024), agr1, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa, and coagulase type III. It was positive for Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) demonstrated that the MRSA was the USA300 clone, which is the predominant community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) in the US. Strain NN47 was divergent, in terms of the spa type and patterns of PFGE and plasmids, from the USA300-0114 type strain or USA300 strain NN36, previously isolated from a visitor (Indian girl) from the US. Strain NN47 was resistant to erythromycin, in addition to β-lactam agents (e.g., oxacillin). These data demonstrate the first emergence of the USA300 clone in Japanese children who have never been abroad and have had no contact with foreigners (and therefore, the first USA300 spread in Japan), and also emergence of multiple divergent strains of the USA300 clone in Japan. Because the USA300 clone is highly transmissible and virulent, surveillance of the USA300 clone is needed.

Keywords

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) Arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) Child 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank L. K. McDougal and L. L. McDonald for the USA300 type strain.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wataru Higuchi
    • 1
  • Shigenao Mimura
    • 2
  • Yoshihiro Kurosawa
    • 2
  • Tomomi Takano
    • 1
  • Yasuhisa Iwao
    • 1
  • Shizuka Yabe
    • 1
  • Olga Razvina
    • 1
  • Akihito Nishiyama
    • 1
  • Yurika Ikeda-Dantsuji
    • 3
  • Fuminori Sakai
    • 3
  • Hideaki Hanaki
    • 3
  • Tatsuo Yamamoto
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Bacteriology, Department of Infectious Disease Control and International MedicineNiigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesNiigataJapan
  2. 2.Ageo Central General HospitalSaitamaJapan
  3. 3.Research Center for Anti-Infectious Drugs and Kitasato Institute for Life SciencesKitasato UniversityTokyoJapan

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