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Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 144–149 | Cite as

Molecular characteristics of the Taiwanese multiple drug-resistant ST59 clone of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from pediatric cellulitis

  • Wataru Higuchi
  • Wei-Chun Hung
  • Tomomi Takano
  • Yasuhisa Iwao
  • Kyoko Ozaki
  • Hirokazu Isobe
  • Lee-Jene Teng
  • Tetsuya Shimazaki
  • Akihito Honda
  • Masato Higashide
  • Hideaki Hanaki
  • Tatsuo YamamotoEmail author
Note

Abstract

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), which often produces Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL), has emerged worldwide as a life-threatening pathogen. Herein, we describe molecular characteristics of MRSA isolated from abdominal cellulitis in a 7-year-old Japanese boy. This MRSA was PVL-positive and belonged to the Taiwanese multiple drug-resistant CA-MRSA clone with the genotype of ST59, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) VII (SCCmecV, according to recent reclassification), agr1a (a novel agr1 subtype), and SaPI (which carried seb1, a newly designated variant seb gene). This study demonstrates the first isolation of the Taiwanese PVL-positive ST59 MRSA clone in Japan. The data also demonstrate novel subtypes in agr1 and seb and suggest that a combination of agr1a, seb1, and PVL could contribute to cellulitis (and its recurrence). Recently, a variety of PVL-positive MRSA clones are accumulating in Japan.

Keywords

Cellulitis Child Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by grants from Interchange Association, Japan, and from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wataru Higuchi
    • 1
  • Wei-Chun Hung
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomomi Takano
    • 1
  • Yasuhisa Iwao
    • 1
  • Kyoko Ozaki
    • 1
  • Hirokazu Isobe
    • 1
  • Lee-Jene Teng
    • 2
  • Tetsuya Shimazaki
    • 3
  • Akihito Honda
    • 4
  • Masato Higashide
    • 5
  • Hideaki Hanaki
    • 6
  • Tatsuo Yamamoto
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Bacteriology, Department of Infectious Disease Control and International MedicineNiigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesNiigataJapan
  2. 2.National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of MedicineTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Shimazaki ClinicChibaJapan
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsAsahi General HospitalChibaJapan
  5. 5.Koutoubiken Medical LaboratoriesIbarakiJapan
  6. 6.Research Center for Anti-Infectious DrugsKitasato UniversityTokyoJapan

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