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Techniques in Coloproctology

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 73–77 | Cite as

Laparoscopic prosthetic parastomal and perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection

  • G. DapriEmail author
  • L. Gerard
  • L. Cardinali
  • D. Repullo
  • I. Surdeanu
  • S. H. Sondji
  • G.-B. Cadière
  • S. Saussez
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Introduction

Abdominoperineal resection (APR), described since 1908 [1], is a procedure performed for low rectal cancer when sphincter preservation is not feasible. Patients who undergo this procedure can present some late complications, like parastomal and perineal hernias.

Parastomal hernia (PSH) is an incisional hernia located at or immediately adjacent to a stoma, reported with an incidence of up to 76% of patients with a stoma, usually occurring within 2 years of ostomy creation, but sometimes up to 20 or 30 years after surgery [2]. It is related to increasing age, abdominal obesity, poor nutritional status, corticosteroid use, increased intraabdominal pressure, and other predisposing disorders. Laparoscopy permits a more precise repair, and the preferred options are currently the Sugarbaker/modified Sugarbaker or “sandwich” techniques instead of the keyhole technique [3]. The results of PSH repair have been disappointing, with reported recurrence rates of 30–76% after local...

Keywords

Parastomal Hernia Small Bowel Loop Perineal Hernia Transfascial Suture Operative Room Table 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Supplementary material

Supplementary material 1 (MP4 87065 kb)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Dapri
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • L. Gerard
    • 1
  • L. Cardinali
    • 1
  • D. Repullo
    • 1
  • I. Surdeanu
    • 1
  • S. H. Sondji
    • 1
  • G.-B. Cadière
    • 1
  • S. Saussez
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, European School of Laparoscopic SurgerySaint-Pierre University Hospital, Université Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Laboratory of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and PharmacyUniversity of MonsMonsBelgium

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