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Techniques in Coloproctology

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 43–45 | Cite as

AirSeal system insufflator to maintain a stable pneumorectum during TAMIS

  • G. BislenghiEmail author
  • A. M. Wolthuis
  • A. de Buck van Overstraeten
  • A. D’Hoore
Multimedia Article

Abstract

Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) is typically used for treating intraluminal rectal tumors. Other applications have recently been described. We here present the use of TAMIS as a tool to treat a chronic anastomotic fistula after restorative rectal resection. A new insufflation device expected to solve the problem of maintaining a stable pneumorectum is described.

Keywords

Anastomotic leakage Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) Pneumorectum AirSeal® System Insufflator 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

Supplementary material

Supplementary material 1 (MPEG 158100 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia Srl 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bislenghi
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. M. Wolthuis
    • 1
  • A. de Buck van Overstraeten
    • 1
  • A. D’Hoore
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Abdominal SurgeryUniversity Hospital Gasthuisberg LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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