International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 53–58 | Cite as

Human papillomavirus vaccination of the daughters of obstetricians and gynecologists in Japan

  • Tomomi Egawa-Takata
  • Yutaka Ueda
  • Akiko Morimoto
  • Yusuke Tanaka
  • Shinya Matsuzaki
  • Eiji Kobayashi
  • Kiyoshi Yoshino
  • Masayuki Sekine
  • Takayuki Enomoto
  • Tadashi Kimura
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Most adolescents in Japan have recently been refraining from receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, following media reports of adverse medical events surrounding the vaccination and suspension of the Japanese governmental recommendation. We have previously reported that HPV vaccination of young girls is heavily influenced by guidance from their physicians concerning the vaccine and by the knowledge and attitude of the girls’ mothers towards cervical cancer. However, it has been unclear as to how the obstetricians and gynecologists were themselves affected by the negative media reports.

Methods

A questionnaire, including questions about their working status, attitudes toward HPV vaccination and about cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccination status of their daughters, was posted to obstetricians and gynecologists.

Results

None of the daughters of the responding obstetrician and gynecologists received the HPV vaccination after the announced suspension of the governmental recommendation for the vaccine. The number who received the HPV vaccine in the 6th to 9th grade in 2014 was significantly lower than those in 2012 (p = 0.012). However, 64.7 % of the responders whose daughters were eligible and in the 6th to 12th grade still intended to vaccinate their daughters in the future. Of the responders, 65 % also intended to recommend vaccination to their teenage patients.

Conclusions

Our study revealed that obstetricians and gynecologists, like the general population, were negatively influenced by media reports of the adverse effect of the HPV vaccine and the suspension of the governmental recommendation. However, their intention to vaccinate their daughters was much higher than that of the general population. Restart of the governmental recommendation for HPV vaccines and better education about the HPV vaccine, including its adverse effects, and about cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening, are strongly recommended, for both the general public and for doctors, for improved prevention of cervical cancer.

Keywords

Obstetrician Gynecologist Japan Human papillomavirus Vaccine Questionnaire 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Dr. G. S. Buzard for his constructive critiques and editing of our manuscript. We deeply appreciate Ms. Asami Yagi and Ms. Kanako Sakiyama for their support.

Conflict of interest

Authors Yutaka Ueda and Takayuki Enomoto receive lecture fee and research funding from Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD.) and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to conduct a different study. Shinya Matsuzaki received research funding from MSD. Tadashi Kimura received a lecture fee from MSD and GSK.

Supplementary material

10147_2015_869_MOESM1_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 16 kb)

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomomi Egawa-Takata
    • 1
  • Yutaka Ueda
    • 1
  • Akiko Morimoto
    • 1
  • Yusuke Tanaka
    • 1
  • Shinya Matsuzaki
    • 1
  • Eiji Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Kiyoshi Yoshino
    • 1
  • Masayuki Sekine
    • 2
  • Takayuki Enomoto
    • 2
  • Tadashi Kimura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyOsaka University Graduate School of MedicineOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyNiigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesNiigataJapan

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