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International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 651–656 | Cite as

Role of CD44 expression in non-tumor tissue on intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

  • Lkhagva-Ochir Tovuu
  • Satoru ImuraEmail author
  • Tohru Utsunomiya
  • Yuji Morine
  • Tetsuya Ikemoto
  • Yusuke Arakawa
  • Hiroki Mori
  • Jun Hanaoka
  • Mami Kanamoto
  • Koji Sugimoto
  • Shuichi Iwahashi
  • Yu Saito
  • Shinichiro Yamada
  • Michihito Asanoma
  • Hidenori Miyake
  • Mitsuo Shimada
Original Article

Abstract

Background

CD44 is well known to be one of the cancer stem cell markers and is a cell-surface glycoprotein involved in cell–cell interactions, cell adhesion, and cell migration. We investigated the role of CD44 expression in both tumor and non-tumor tissues on recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Methods

Forty-eight patients with HCC who underwent hepatic resection at our institution were enrolled in this study. CD44 expressions in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were examined using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The patients were divided into two groups: high and low gene-expression group, based on the CD44 expression level. We compared the clinicopathological factors between the high expression and low expression groups in both tumor and non-tumor tissues.

Results

In the tumor tissues, the gene-expression levels of CD44 did not correlate with any clinicopathological parameters. The disease-free survival rate showed no significant difference between the two groups. In non-tumor tissues, although there was no significant relationship between the CD44 expression levels and clinicopathological factors, disease-free survival rate in the CD44 low expression group was significantly better than that in the CD44 high expression group (P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, the risk factors in tumor recurrence were presence of microscopic portal invasion and high expression level of CD44.

Conclusion

The CD44 expressions in the non-tumor tissues may predict HCC recurrence.

Keywords

Hepatocellular carcinoma CD44 Prognostic factor Non-tumor tissue 

Abbreviations

HCC

Hepatocellular carcinoma

RT-PCR

Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

GAPDH

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

AST

Aspartate aminotransferase

ALT

Alanine transaminase

WBC

White blood cell

PT

Prothrombin time

ICGR15

Indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min

AFP

Alpha-fetoprotein

DCP

Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (20390359) and for Scientific Research (C) (22591506), and Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Exploratory Research (22659233 and 22659243), Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. This work was also supported in part by a grant from the Cancer Research Project Cooperated by TAIHO Pharmaceutical Co., LTD., and the University of Tokushima.

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lkhagva-Ochir Tovuu
    • 1
  • Satoru Imura
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tohru Utsunomiya
    • 1
  • Yuji Morine
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Ikemoto
    • 1
  • Yusuke Arakawa
    • 1
  • Hiroki Mori
    • 1
  • Jun Hanaoka
    • 1
  • Mami Kanamoto
    • 1
  • Koji Sugimoto
    • 1
  • Shuichi Iwahashi
    • 1
  • Yu Saito
    • 1
  • Shinichiro Yamada
    • 1
  • Michihito Asanoma
    • 1
  • Hidenori Miyake
    • 1
  • Mitsuo Shimada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Institute of Health BiosciencesThe University of TokushimaTokushimaJapan

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