International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 1–29 | Cite as

Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) guidelines 2010 for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  • Toshiaki Watanabe
  • Michio Itabashi
  • Yasuhiro Shimada
  • Shinji Tanaka
  • Yoshinori Ito
  • Yoichi Ajioka
  • Tetsuya Hamaguchi
  • Ichinosuke Hyodo
  • Masahiro Igarashi
  • Hideyuki Ishida
  • Megumi Ishiguro
  • Yukihide Kanemitsu
  • Norihiro Kokudo
  • Kei Muro
  • Atsushi Ochiai
  • Masahiko Oguchi
  • Yasuo Ohkura
  • Yutaka Saito
  • Yoshiharu Sakai
  • Hideki Ueno
  • Takayuki Yoshino
  • Takahiro Fujimori
  • Nobuo Koinuma
  • Takayuki Morita
  • Genichi Nishimura
  • Yuh Sakata
  • Keiichi Takahashi
  • Hiroya Takiuchi
  • Osamu Tsuruta
  • Toshiharu Yamaguchi
  • Masahiro Yoshida
  • Naohiko Yamaguchi
  • Kenjiro Kotake
  • Kenichi Sugihara
  • Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum
Special Article

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is a major cause of death in Japan, where it accounts for the largest number of deaths from malignant neoplasms in women and the third largest number in men. Many new treatment methods have been developed over the last few decades. The Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) guidelines 2010 for the treatment of colorectal cancer (JSCCR Guidelines 2010) have been prepared to show standard treatment strategies for colorectal cancer, to eliminate disparities among institutions in terms of treatment, to eliminate unnecessary treatment and insufficient treatment, and to deepen mutual understanding between health-care professionals and patients by making these Guidelines available to the general public. These Guidelines have been prepared by consensuses reached by the JSCCR Guideline Committee, based on a careful review of the evidence retrieved by literature searches and in view of the medical health insurance system and actual clinical practice settings in Japan. Therefore, these Guidelines can be used as a tool for treating colorectal cancer in actual clinical practice settings. More specifically, they can be used as a guide to obtaining informed consent from patients and choosing the method of treatment for each patient. As a result of the discussions held by the Guideline Committee, controversial issues were selected as Clinical Questions, and recommendations were made. Each recommendation is accompanied by a classification of the evidence and a classification of recommendation categories based on the consensus reached by the Guideline Committee members. Here we present the English version of the JSCCR Guidelines 2010.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer Guideline Treatment Surgery Chemotherapy Endoscopy Radiotherapy Palliative care Surveillance 

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiaki Watanabe
    • 1
  • Michio Itabashi
    • 2
  • Yasuhiro Shimada
    • 3
  • Shinji Tanaka
    • 4
  • Yoshinori Ito
    • 5
  • Yoichi Ajioka
    • 6
  • Tetsuya Hamaguchi
    • 3
  • Ichinosuke Hyodo
    • 7
  • Masahiro Igarashi
    • 8
  • Hideyuki Ishida
    • 9
  • Megumi Ishiguro
    • 10
  • Yukihide Kanemitsu
    • 11
  • Norihiro Kokudo
    • 12
  • Kei Muro
    • 13
  • Atsushi Ochiai
    • 14
  • Masahiko Oguchi
    • 15
  • Yasuo Ohkura
    • 16
  • Yutaka Saito
    • 17
  • Yoshiharu Sakai
    • 18
  • Hideki Ueno
    • 19
  • Takayuki Yoshino
    • 20
  • Takahiro Fujimori
    • 21
  • Nobuo Koinuma
    • 22
  • Takayuki Morita
    • 23
  • Genichi Nishimura
    • 24
  • Yuh Sakata
    • 25
  • Keiichi Takahashi
    • 26
  • Hiroya Takiuchi
    • 27
  • Osamu Tsuruta
    • 28
  • Toshiharu Yamaguchi
    • 29
  • Masahiro Yoshida
    • 30
  • Naohiko Yamaguchi
    • 31
  • Kenjiro Kotake
    • 32
  • Kenichi Sugihara
    • 10
  • Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryTeikyo University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Surgery 2Tokyo Women’s Medical UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Gastrointestinal Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of EndoscopyHiroshima University HospitalHiroshimaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Radiation OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Division of Molecular and Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesNiigata UniversityNiigataJapan
  7. 7.Division of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human SciencesUniversity of TsukubaIbarakiJapan
  8. 8.Department of EndoscopyCancer Institute Ariake HospitalTokyoJapan
  9. 9.Department of Digestive Tract and General Surgery, Saitama Medical CenterSaitama Medical UniversitySaitamaJapan
  10. 10.Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate SchoolTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityTokyoJapan
  11. 11.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryAichi Cancer CenterNagoyaJapan
  12. 12.Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery Division, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  13. 13.Department of Clinical OncologyAichi Cancer Center HospitalNagoyaJapan
  14. 14.Pathology Division, Research Center for Innovative OncologyNational Cancer Centre Hospital EastChibaJapan
  15. 15.Radiation Oncology DepartmentThe Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer ResearchTokyoJapan
  16. 16.Department of PathologyKyorin University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  17. 17.Endoscopy DivisionNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  18. 18.Department of SurgeryKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  19. 19.Department of SurgeryNational Defense Medical CollegeSaitamaJapan
  20. 20.Department of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital EastChibaJapan
  21. 21.Department of Surgical and Molecular PathologyDokkyo Medical University School of MedicineTochigiJapan
  22. 22.Department of Health Administration and PolicyTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineSendaiJapan
  23. 23.Department of Surgery, Cancer CenterAomori Prefectural Central HospitalAomoriJapan
  24. 24.Department of SurgeryJapanese Red Cross Kanazawa HospitalIshikawaJapan
  25. 25.Department of Internal Medicine and Medical OncologyMisawa City HospitalMisawaJapan
  26. 26.Department of SurgeryTokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center, Komagome HospitalTokyoJapan
  27. 27.Cancer Chemotherapy CenterOsaka Medical CollegeOsakaJapan
  28. 28.Division of Gastrointestinal EndoscopyKurume University School of MedicineFukuokaJapan
  29. 29.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryCancer Institute HospitalTokyoJapan
  30. 30.Department of Hemodialysis and SurgeryChemotherapy Research Institute, International University of Health and WelfareIchikawaJapan
  31. 31.Library, Toho University Medical Center Sakura HospitalChibaJapan
  32. 32.Department of SurgeryTochigi Cancer CenterUtsunomiyaJapan

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