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Current therapeutic strategies for anal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan

  • Atsuo Takashima
  • Yasuhiro Shimada
  • Tetsuya Hamaguchi
  • Yoshinori Ito
  • Tadahiko Masaki
  • Shigeki Yamaguchi
  • Yukifumi Kondo
  • Norio Saito
  • Tomoyuki Kato
  • Masayuki Ohue
  • Masayuki Higashino
  • Yoshihiro Moriya
  • for the Colorectal Cancer Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group
Original Article

Abstract

Background

In Western countries, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is well established as the standard therapy for stages II/III anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC). In Japan, the therapeutic modalities for and outcomes of this disease have not been clarified because ASCC is quite rare. The Colorectal Cancer Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG-CCSG) conducted a survey to determine the current therapeutic strategies for ASCC in Japan.

Methods

In July 2006, a questionnaire was sent to 49 institutions affiliated with the JCOG-CCSG to gather information on numbers of cases, therapeutic modalities, and outcomes. The target subjects were patients with stages II/III ASCC, diagnosed from January 2000 to December 2004, who were 20–80 years of age with normal major organ function and no severe complications.

Results

Replies were received from 40 institutions. A total of 59 patients satisfied the subject criteria. Detailed information was obtained for 55 subjects; 25 (45%) had stage II ASCC and 30 (55%) had stage III ASCC. CRT was performed in 25 patients (45%); surgery in 17 (31%); surgery combined with radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or CRT in 8 (15%); and RT in 5 (9%). Complete response rate in CRT was 80% (20/25). The 3-year progression-free survival rates for all subjects and for CRT-only subjects were 67% and 77%, respectively.

Conclusion

From 2000 to 2004, only 59 patients with ASCC were identified in the JCOG-CCSG survey and about half of them underwent CRT.

Key words

Anal cancer Squamous cell carcinoma Chemoradiotherapy 

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsuo Takashima
    • 1
  • Yasuhiro Shimada
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Hamaguchi
    • 1
  • Yoshinori Ito
    • 2
  • Tadahiko Masaki
    • 3
  • Shigeki Yamaguchi
    • 4
  • Yukifumi Kondo
    • 5
  • Norio Saito
    • 6
  • Tomoyuki Kato
    • 7
  • Masayuki Ohue
    • 8
  • Masayuki Higashino
    • 9
  • Yoshihiro Moriya
    • 10
  • for the Colorectal Cancer Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group
  1. 1.Division of Gastrointestinal OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Radiation OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryKyorin UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Division of Colon and Rectal SurgeryShizuoka Cancer CenterShizuokaJapan
  5. 5.Department of SurgerySapporo-Kosei General HospitalHokkaidoJapan
  6. 6.Division of Colorectal SurgeryNational Cancer Center Hospital EastChibaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryAichi Cancer Center Central HospitalAichiJapan
  8. 8.Department of Gastrointestinal SurgeryOsaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular DiseasesOsakaJapan
  9. 9.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryOsaka City General HospitalOsakaJapan
  10. 10.Division of Colorectal SurgeryNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan

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