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Population Ecology

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 271–283 | Cite as

Spread of the pinewood nematode vectored by the Japanese pine sawyer: modeling and analytical approaches

  • Katsumi Togashi
  • Nanako Shigesada
Review Special feature: population ecology of biological invasion

Abstract

The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the causative agent of pine wilt of Pinus thunbergii and P. densiflora in Japan. The nematode is vectored by cerambycid beetles of the genus Monochamus. It is inferred to have been introduced from North America early in the 1900s and then to have distributed in China, Korea, and Taiwan. Intensive and/or long-term studies of pine wilt systems have elucidated the pattern and mechanism of the nematode’s spread within a pine stand, dispersal of vector beetles, and spread pattern of pine wilt within a prefecture. The modeling of nematode spread over pine stands, which involves beetle reproduction within a pine stand, has been developing and should elucidate the factors influencing the rate at which the nematode range expands. In this review, we summarize the biologies of the nematode, beetle, and tree, and then characterize the spread of the nematode within a pine stand, locally over pine stands, and regionally over unit administrative districts. Local and regional spreading of the nematode is related primarily to long-distance dispersal by insect vectors and to the artificial transportation of pine logs infested with the nematode and its vector, respectively.

Keywords

Biological invasion Bursaphelenchus xylophilus Monochamus alternatus Pinus Range expansion Pine wilt 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We greatly appreciate the kind permission of the American Society of Ecology and the Springer Science and Business Media for the use of the figures and table. This study was supported in part by a grand-in-aid for scientific research from JSPS (no. 18208013).

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© The Society of Population Ecology and Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Culture and Information ScienceDoshisha UniversityKyotanabeJapan

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