Neurosurgical Review

, Volume 22, Issue 2–3, pp 96–98 | Cite as

Increased levels of nitrite/nitrate in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

  • M. Suzuki
  • Hiroshi Asahara
  • Shigeatsu Endo
  • Katsuya Inada
  • Mamoru Doi
  • Kiyoshi Kuroda
  • Akira Ogawa
Original article

Abstract 

The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the mechanism of delayed cerebral vasospasm (VS) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was investigated by analyzing the stable metabolites of NO, nitrite and nitrate, by the Griess method in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and venous blood of 29 patients with SAH, the CSF of 22 control patients, and venous blood from eight normal subjects. VS was defined as diffuse and severe angiographical vasospasm detected by angiography performed around days 7–9 after the onset. Six of the 29 patients had VS. The nitrite/nitrate levels in the blood of patients with SAH were almost within the range of those in normal subjects, but the levels in the CSF of patients with SAH were significantly higher than those of the control group. Patients with VS after SAH had significantly lower levels in the CSF than patients without VS on days 7–9, when VS is most likely to occur. These observations suggest that NO production in the CSF environment occurs following SAH, but possibly may not provoke VS.

Key words Delayed cerebral vasospasm Cerebrospinal fluid Nitric oxide Subarachnoid hemorrhage 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Suzuki
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Asahara
    • 2
  • Shigeatsu Endo
    • 3
  • Katsuya Inada
    • 4
  • Mamoru Doi
    • 1
  • Kiyoshi Kuroda
    • 1
  • Akira Ogawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, School of Medicine, Uchimaru 19–1, Morioka, 020 Japan Tel: +81-196-51-5111, ext. 6605; Fax: +81-196-25-8799JP
  2. 2.Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Okayama University Medical School, Okayama, JapanJP
  3. 3.Critical Care and Emergency Center, Iwate Medical University, School of Medicine, Uchimaru 19–1, Morioka, 020 JapanJP
  4. 4.Department of Bacteriology, Iwate Medical University, School of Medicine, Uchimaru 19–1, Morioka, 020 JapanJP

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