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Marine Biotechnology

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 49–56 | Cite as

Construction of the BAC Library of Small Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) for Gene Screening and Genome Characterization

  • Likun Jiang
  • Weiwei You
  • Xiaojun Zhang
  • Jian Xu
  • Yanliang Jiang
  • Kai Wang
  • Zixia Zhao
  • Baohua Chen
  • Yunfeng Zhao
  • Shahid Mahboob
  • Khalid A. Al-Ghanim
  • Caihuan KeEmail author
  • Peng XuEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) is one of the most important aquaculture species in East Asia. To facilitate gene cloning and characterization, genome analysis, and genetic breeding of it, we constructed a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, which is an important genetic tool for advanced genetics and genomics research. The small abalone BAC library includes 92,610 clones with an average insert size of 120 Kb, equivalent to approximately 7.6× of the small abalone genome. We set up three-dimensional pools and super pools of 18,432 BAC clones for target gene screening using PCR method. To assess the approach, we screened 12 target genes in these 18,432 BAC clones and identified 16 positive BAC clones. Eight positive BAC clones were then sequenced and assembled with the next generation sequencing platform. The assembled contigs representing these 8 BAC clones spanned 928 Kb of the small abalone genome, providing the first batch of genome sequences for genome evaluation and characterization. The average GC content of small abalone genome was estimated as 40.33 %. A total of 21 protein-coding genes, including 7 target genes, were annotated into the 8 BACs, which proved the feasibility of PCR screening approach with three-dimensional pools in small abalone BAC library. One hundred fifty microsatellite loci were also identified from the sequences for marker development in the future. The BAC library and clone pools provided valuable resources and tools for genetic breeding and conservation of H. diversicolor.

Keywords

BAC Small abalone Haliotis diversicolor Genome Ion Torrent 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge grant support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. U1205121 and 31422057), the National High-Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 program; 2011AA100401), Special Scientific Research Funds for Central Non-profit Institutes of Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences (2013A03YQ01). The authors would like to extend their sincere appreciation to the Deanship of Scientific Research at King Saud University for funding this research (No. RG 1435–012).

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ Contributions

PX and CK conceived the study. LJ worked on BAC library evaluation, BAC pooling, BAC screening, BAC sequencing, assembly, and manuscript drafting. WY worked on sample preparation and collection and participated in the manuscript preparation. XZ and KW worked on agar plugs preparation for HMW genomic DNA extraction. ZZ, KW, and BC worked on BAC pooling and screening. JX and YJ worked on BAC sequencing and sequencing analysis. PX wrote the manuscript. YZ, SM, and KAG helped on the manuscript revision. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Supplementary material

10126_2015_9666_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
Supplemental Table S1 (DOCX 21 kb)
10126_2015_9666_MOESM2_ESM.docx (35 kb)
Supplemental Table S2 (DOCX 34 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Likun Jiang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Weiwei You
    • 2
  • Xiaojun Zhang
    • 3
  • Jian Xu
    • 1
  • Yanliang Jiang
    • 1
  • Kai Wang
    • 1
  • Zixia Zhao
    • 1
  • Baohua Chen
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yunfeng Zhao
    • 1
  • Shahid Mahboob
    • 5
    • 6
  • Khalid A. Al-Ghanim
    • 5
  • Caihuan Ke
    • 2
    Email author
  • Peng Xu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.CAFS Key Laboratory of Aquatic Genomics & Beijing Key Laboratory of Fishery Biotechnology, Centre for Applied Aquatic GenomicsChinese Academy of Fishery SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, College of Ocean & Earth ScienceXiamen UniversityXiamenChina
  3. 3.Institute of OceanologyChinese Academy of ScienceQingdaoChina
  4. 4.College of Life SciencesShanghai Ocean UniversityShanghaiChina
  5. 5.Department of Zoology, College of ScienceKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  6. 6.Department of ZoologyGC UniversityFaisalabadPakistan

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