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Marine Biotechnology

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 462–473 | Cite as

The Protective Effect of ENA Actimineral Resource A on CCl4-Induced Liver Injury in Rats

  • Il-Hwa Hong
  • Hoon Ji
  • Sung-Yong Hwa
  • Won-Il Jeong
  • Da-Hee Jeong
  • Sun-Hee Do
  • Ji-Min Kim
  • Mi-Ran Ki
  • Jin-Kyu Park
  • Moon-Jung Goo
  • Ok-Kyung Hwang
  • Kyung-Sook Hong
  • Jung-Youn Han
  • Hae-Young Chung
  • Kyu-Shik Jeong
Original Article

Abstract

ENA Actimineral Resource A (ENA-A) is alkaline water that is composed of refined edible cuttlefish bone and two different species of seaweed, Phymatolithon calcareum and Lithothamnion corallioides. In the present study, ENA-A was investigated as an antioxidant to protect against CCl4-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in rats. Liver injury was induced by either subacute or chronic CCl4 administration, and the rats had free access to tap water mixed with 0% (control group) or 10% (v/v) ENA-A for 5 or 8 weeks. The results of histological examination and measurement of antioxidant activity showed that the reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation, induction of CYP2E1 were decreased and the antioxidant activity, including glutathione and catalase production, was increased in the ENA-A groups as compared with the control group. On 2-DE gel analysis of the proteomes, 13 differentially expressed proteins were obtained in the ENA-A groups as compared with the control group. Antioxidant proteins, including glutathione S-transferase, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1, and peroxiredoxin 1, were increased with hepatocyte nuclear factor 3-beta and serum albumin precursor, and kininogen precursor decreased more in the ENA-A groups than compared to the control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that ENA-A does indeed have some protective capabilities against CCl4-induced liver injury through its antioxidant function.

Keywords

ENA actimineral resource A Antioxidant capability Hepatoxicity Seaweed Carbon tetrachloride 

Notes

Conflicts of Interest

The authors certify that they have nothing to disclose and no financial interests pertaining to this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Il-Hwa Hong
    • 1
  • Hoon Ji
    • 1
  • Sung-Yong Hwa
    • 2
  • Won-Il Jeong
    • 1
  • Da-Hee Jeong
    • 1
  • Sun-Hee Do
    • 3
  • Ji-Min Kim
    • 4
  • Mi-Ran Ki
    • 1
  • Jin-Kyu Park
    • 1
  • Moon-Jung Goo
    • 1
  • Ok-Kyung Hwang
    • 1
  • Kyung-Sook Hong
    • 1
  • Jung-Youn Han
    • 1
  • Hae-Young Chung
    • 4
  • Kyu-Shik Jeong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Jinju Bio FoodJinjuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Pathology,College of Veterinary MedicineKonkuk UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Pharmacy, Longevity Life Science and Technology InstitutePusan National UniversityPusanRepublic of Korea

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