Chinese Journal of Polymer Science

, Volume 33, Issue 7, pp 1048–1057

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted dual stimuli-responsive filter paper for protein separation

  • Qi-jia-yu Wu
  • Rui Wang
  • Ying Zhou
  • Ya-qin Huang
  • Raja Ghosh
  • Xiao-nong Chen (陈晓农)
Papers

DOI: 10.1007/s10118-015-1655-6

Cite this article as:
Wu, Q., Wang, R., Zhou, Y. et al. Chin J Polym Sci (2015) 33: 1048. doi:10.1007/s10118-015-1655-6

Abstract

Thermal and salt dual stimuli-responsive filter-paper-based membranes were prepared by UV-induced grafting of NIPAM-based polymers on paper surface. The grafting ratio could be controlled by monomer concentration during grafting polymerization. The results from pressure drop measurement of the mobile phase flowed cross the membrane demonstrate that an appropriate grafting ratio would be 8%–10%. Protein adsorption on the membrane through hydrophobic interaction could be promoted by increasing temperature and lyotropic salt concentration. The effect of grafted polymer structure on protein binding performance was studied. Filter paper grafted with NIPAM-based branched copolymer consisting of hydrophobic monomer moieties shows ten times higher protein binding capacity than that of the original filter paper. The separation of plasma proteins using the dual stimuli-responsive membrane was examined to demonstrate feasible application for hydrophobic interaction chromatographic separation of proteins.

Keywords

N-isopropyl acrylamide Filter paper Surface grafting Stimuli-responsive hydrophobic transition Protein separation 

Copyright information

© Chinese Chemical Society, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qi-jia-yu Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Wang
    • 1
  • Ying Zhou
    • 1
  • Ya-qin Huang
    • 1
  • Raja Ghosh
    • 2
  • Xiao-nong Chen (陈晓农)
    • 1
  1. 1.Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical MaterialsBeijing University of Chemical TechnologyBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Chemical EngineeringMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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