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Regional Environmental Change

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 1059–1071 | Cite as

Co-creating a desirable and resilient future for Lienz, Austria—a local case study in socio-economic scenario development

  • Ina MeyerEmail author
  • Michiko Hama
  • Robert Jandl
  • Markus Leitner
  • Markus Keuschnig
  • Ivonne Anders
  • Oliver Fritz
  • Helene Berthold
  • Brigitte Eder
Original Article

Abstract

The aim of this case study was to conduct a participatory approach to socio-economic scenario development in the city of Lienz (East Tyrol) and to suggest this process-oriented approach as an element of an integrated guiding and decision support tool for local resilience and risk management to policy makers, business leaders, and civil society. The paper takes a socio-economic perspective and describes the settings of the case study, the process, and approach taken for co-creating two distinct normative socio-economic scenario narratives for the city of Lienz: a desirable or resilient future and an undesirable or stagnant future. Results are presented as sector-specific scenario narratives. Matching the local scenario narratives with the global shared socio-economic pathways, it derives that local peculiarities such as population decline due to outmigration trends or decentralized manufacturing industry and educational institutions were judged to be critical factors in securing local resilience for a prospering future.

Keywords

Co-creation Local socio-economic scenario development Local resilience 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The findings presented stem from the project ARISE. Many thanks go to the participants of the stakeholder workshop in Lienz, in particular Oskar Januschke, for sharing their views. We are grateful to Reinhard Mechler for constructive advice, to Susanne Markytan for research assistance, and to conference participants for stimulating discussions. Last but not least, we thank the anonymous reviewers for valuable guidance in the revision of our paper.

Funding information

ARISE was funded by “The Climate and Energy Fund of the Austrian Federal Government” within the framework of the “Austrian Climate Research Programme.”

Supplementary material

10113_2018_1439_MOESM1_ESM.docx (4.2 mb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 4351 kb)
10113_2018_1439_MOESM2_ESM.docx (125 kb)
ESM 2 (DOCX 124 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Austrian Institute of Economic Research – WIFOViennaAustria
  2. 2.Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss (former affiliation: alpS - Centre for Climate Change Adaptation, Innsbruck, Austria)ZurichSwitzerland
  3. 3.Austrian Research Center for Forests – BFWViennaAustria
  4. 4.Environment Agency AustriaViennaAustria
  5. 5.GEORESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbHWalsAustria
  6. 6.ZAMG – Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik)ViennaAustria
  7. 7.Austrian Agency for Health and Food – AGESViennaAustria
  8. 8.alpS - Centre for Climate Change AdaptationInnsbruckAustria

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