Regional Environmental Change

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 595–606 | Cite as

Facing the wave of change: stakeholder perspectives on climate adaptation for Australian seafood supply chains

  • Lilly Lim-Camacho
  • Alistair J. Hobday
  • Rodrigo H. Bustamante
  • Anna Farmery
  • Aysha Fleming
  • Stewart Frusher
  • Bridget S. Green
  • Ana Norman-López
  • Gretta T. Pecl
  • Éva E. Plagányi
  • Peggy Schrobback
  • Olivier Thebaud
  • Linda Thomas
  • Ingrid van Putten
Original Article

Abstract

Climate change is one of the most important issues confronting the sustainable supply of seafood, with projections suggesting major effects on wild and farmed fisheries worldwide. While climate change has been a consideration for Australian fisheries and aquaculture management, emphasis in both research and adaptation effort has been at the production end of supply chains—impacts further along the chain have been overlooked to date. A holistic biophysical and socio-economic system view of seafood industries, as represented by end-to-end supply chains, may lead to an additional set of options in the face of climate change, thus maximizing opportunities for improved fishery profitability, while also reducing the potential for maladaptation. In this paper, we explore Australian seafood industry stakeholder perspectives on potential options for adaptation along seafood supply chains based on future potential scenarios. Stakeholders, representing wild capture and aquaculture industries, provided a range of actions targeting different stages of the supply chain. Overall, proposed strategies were predominantly related to the production end of the supply chain, suggesting that greater attention in developing adaptation options is needed at post-production stages. However, there are chain-wide adaptation strategies that can present win–win scenarios, where commercial objectives beyond adaptation can also be addressed alongside direct or indirect impacts of climate. Likewise, certain adaptation strategies in place at one stage of the chain may have varying implications on other stages of the chain. These findings represent an important step in understanding the role of supply chains in effective adaptation of fisheries and aquaculture industries to climate change.

Keywords

Adaptation planning Climate scenarios Perception analysis Sustainability 

Supplementary material

10113_2014_670_MOESM1_ESM.docx (32 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 31 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lilly Lim-Camacho
    • 1
  • Alistair J. Hobday
    • 2
  • Rodrigo H. Bustamante
    • 3
  • Anna Farmery
    • 4
  • Aysha Fleming
    • 2
  • Stewart Frusher
    • 4
  • Bridget S. Green
    • 4
  • Ana Norman-López
    • 3
  • Gretta T. Pecl
    • 4
  • Éva E. Plagányi
    • 3
  • Peggy Schrobback
    • 5
  • Olivier Thebaud
    • 3
  • Linda Thomas
    • 3
  • Ingrid van Putten
    • 2
  1. 1.Climate Adaptation FlagshipPullenvaleAustralia
  2. 2.Climate Adaptation FlagshipCSIRO Marine and Atmospheric ResearchHobartAustralia
  3. 3.Climate Adaptation FlagshipCSIRO Marine and Atmospheric ResearchBrisbaneAustralia
  4. 4.Institute for Marine and Antarctic StudiesUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia
  5. 5.Queensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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