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Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 115–126 | Cite as

Photobiomodulation with single and combination laser wavelengths on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: proliferation and differentiation to bone or cartilage

  • Reza FekrazadEmail author
  • Sohrab Asefi
  • Mohammadreza Baghban Eslaminejad
  • Leila Taghiar
  • Sima Bordbar
  • Michael R. HamblinEmail author
Original Article
  • 168 Downloads

Abstract

Tissue engineering aims to take advantage of the ability of undifferentiated stem cells to differentiate into multiple cell types to repair damaged tissue. Photobiomodulation uses either lasers or light-emitting diodes to promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation. The present study aimed to investigate single and dual combinations of laser wavelengths on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs were derived from rabbit iliac bone marrow. One control and eight laser irradiated groups were designated as Infrared (IR, 810 nm), Red (R, 660 nm), Green (G, 532 nm), Blue (B, 485 nm), IR–R, IR–B, R–G, and B–G. Irradiation was repeated daily for 21 days and cell proliferation, osseous, or cartilaginous differentiation was then measured. RT-PCR biomarkers were SOX9, aggrecan, COL 2, and COL 10 expression for cartilage and ALP, COL 1, and osteocalcin expression for bone. Cellular proliferation was increased in all irradiated groups except G. All cartilage markers were significantly increased by IR and IR–B except COL 10 which was suppressed by IR–B combination. ALP expression was highest in R and IR groups during osseous differentiation. ALP was decreased by combinations of IR with B and with R, and also by G alone. R and B–G groups showed stimulated COL 1 expression; however, COL 1 was suppressed in IR–B, IR–R, and G groups. IR significantly increased osteocalcin expression, but in B, B–G, and G groups it was reduced. Cartilage differentiation was stimulated by IR and IR–B laser irradiation. The effects of single or combined laser irradiation were not clear-cut on osseous differentiation. Stimulatory effects on osteogenesis were seen for R and IR lasers, while G laser had inhibitory effects.

Keywords

Photobiomodulation Low level light therapy Mesenchymal stem cells, bone Cartilage Comparison of wavelengths 

Notes

Funding information

AJA University of Medical Sciences and Royan Institute supported this study. MRH was supported by US NIH grants R01AI050875 and R21AI121700.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Periodontics Department, Dentistry School, Laser Research Center in Medical SciencesAJA University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.International Network for Photo Medicine and Photo Dynamic Therapy (INPMPDT)Universal Scientific Education and ResearchNetwork (USERN)TehranIran
  3. 3.Orthodontic Department, Dentistry SchoolInternational Campus of Tehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  4. 4.Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and TechnologyACECRTehranIran
  5. 5.Wellman Center for PhotomedicineMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  6. 6.Department of DermatologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  7. 7.Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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